The Collected Works of Theodore Parker: Critical writings (Google eBook)

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Trübner, 1865 - Theology
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Page 210 - Give me health and a day, and I will make the pomp of emperors ridiculous.
Page 218 - The relations of the soul to the divine spirit are so pure that it is profane to seek to interpose helps. It must be that when God speaketh he should communicate, not one thing, but all things ; should fill the world with his voice ; should scatter forth light, nature, time, souls, from the centre of the present thought; and new date and new create the whole.
Page 227 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome And groined the aisles of Christian Rome Wrought in a sad sincerity ; Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew ; — The conscious stone to beauty grew.
Page 211 - The book, the college, the school of art, the institution of any kind, stop with some past utterance of genius. This is good, say they, — let us hold by this. They pin me down. They look backward and not forward. But genius looks forward; the eyes of man are set in his forehead, not in his hindhead; man hopes; genius creates.
Page 209 - Crossing a bare common in snow puddles at twilight under a clouded sky, without having in my thoughts any occurrence of special good fortune, I have enjoyed a perfect exhilaration. I am glad to the brink of fear.
Page 227 - These temples grew as grows the grass; Art might obey, but not surpass. The passive Master lent his hand To the vast soul that o'er him planned ; And the same power that reared the shrine Bestrode the tribes that knelt within.
Page 299 - Who is gone into Heaven, and is on the Right Hand of God ; Angels and authorities and powers being made subject unto Him.
Page 221 - Nature is thoroughly mediate. It is made to serve. It receives the dominion of man as meekly as the ass on which the Saviour rode.
Page 210 - In the woods, we return to reason and faith. There I feel that nothing can befall me in life— no disgrace, no calamity (leaving me my eyes), which nature cannot repair.
Page 288 - There shall never be any bond slavery, villeinage, or captivity amongst us unless it be lawful captives taken in just wars, and such strangers as willingly sell themselves or are sold to us.