Persistent Inequalities: Women and World Development

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Oxford University Press, 1990 - Business & Economics - 302 pages
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Synthesizing the vast amount of research done in the last two decades on the roles of women in economic development, this anthology provides both a historical and political overview of the field and a careful examination of major areas of current research. The volume brings together essays by women and men from an international field of scholars representing a wide spectrum of disciplines, including women's studies, economics, sociology, political science, and anthropology. The eminent contributors include Ester Boserup, whose work established the theoretical foundation for the study of women's roles in economic development; she offers a succinct account of her theories as an introduction to the other essays. The first part of the book places the field in a broad historical perspective, showing how far it has come and where it is going, and sets the stage for the ensuing debate in which renowned scholars such as Amartya Sen, Hanna Papanek, Joycelin Massiah, Simi Afonja, and Vina Mazumdar explore in detail two of the most important issues confronting women in the Third World today: the intrahousehold distribution of income and resources and the persistence of patriarchy. A unique contribution to the study of women in developing countries, Persistent Inequalities is certain to become a standard resource for courses in women's studies, development economics, political science, urban studies, sociology, and agricultural development.

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About the author (1990)

Irene Tinker is at University of California, Berkeley.

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