Domes of Heaven: The Domed Basilicas of Cyprus

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ProQuest, 2008 - 489 pages
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The Church of Cyprus became an independent exarchy in the fifth century. This cultural autonomy provided Cypriots with a sense of pride and freedom that was not shared by other Byzantine provinces. Since the late fourth century, the Church built many wooden roofed basilicas on the island. Then in 649 AD Arabs invaded and destroyed many of its Early Christian buildings. From that time until 965, the Byzantine Empire and the Arab Caliphate of Damascus divided tribute from the population. During these centuries five churches were rebuilt, but with a radically different design than the previous structures---they were vaulted with a series of multiple domes. This dissertation is a comprehensive study of these monuments with three objectives: (1) to provide a complete architectural analysis; (2) to place these monuments in their cultural and historical context by assessing primary and secondary literature, and archaeological reports; and (3) to explain the symbolic importance that this new design conveyed. It proposes that the three-domed basilica was peculiar to Cyprus. The architecture was a manifestation of the Cypriots' unique political situation and their ideological concerns. By adopting three domes along the nave, church officials combined the Dome of Heaven motif with mystification of the liturgy promoted by Maximus the Confessor.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Conclusion
28
Conclusion
62
Agios Epifanios
63
Conclusion
89
Conclusion
115
Conclusion
151
vii
158
Summary and Final Remarks
198
Supplementary Material
205
Figures for Chapter 2
296
Figures for Chapter 3
340
Figures for Chapter 4
359
Figures for Chapter 5
381
Figures for Chapter 7
419
Bibliography
426

Conclusion
197

Common terms and phrases

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