Wild Wales: its people, language and scenery (Google eBook)

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G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1900 - Wales - 733 pages
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Review: Wild Wales

User Review  - Rollie Reid - Goodreads

Wild Wales is the account of George Burrows' walk through Wales in 1854. Now, we are not talking about a little walk, we are talking about months of walking across a major portion of Wales. He starts ... Read full review

Review: Wild Wales

User Review  - Liz - Goodreads

Borrow was in his early 50s when he began his walking tour of Wales. He recounts conversations and vistas, reflecting an interesting time before cars but after trains. The Industrial Revolution is at ... Read full review

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Page 730 - THE BORROWER WILL BE CHARGED AN OVERDUE FEE IF THIS BOOK 18 NOT RETURNED TO THE LIBRARY ON OR BEFORE THE LAST DATE STAMPED BELOW. NON-RECEIPT OF OVERDUE NOTICES DOES NOT EXEMPT THE BORROWER FROM OVERDUE FEES. I...
Page xi - Full face, front view with a plain white or off-white background Between 1 inch and 1 3/8 inches from the bottom of the chin...
Page 563 - ... their agonies of shame and rage, would deserve to be emasculated. Had Ab Gwilym been so dead to every feeling of gratitude and honour as to play the part which the story makes him play, he would have deserved not only to be emasculated, but to be scourged with harpstrings in every market town in Wales, and to be dismissed from the service of the Muse. But the writer repeats that he does not believe one tittle of the story, though Ab Gwilym's biographer, the learned and celebrated William Owen,...
Page 443 - Into each other fastened they The form of a hard knot display. There dwells the chief we all extol In timber house on lightsome knoll ; Upon four wooden columns proud Mounteth his mansion to the cloud ; Each...
Page 162 - Your hanner will give me a shilling ? " " Yes," said I ; "if you play Croppies Lie Down ; but you know you cannot play it, your fingers never learned the tune." " They never did, your hanner ; but they have heard it played of ould by the blackguard Orange fiddlers of Dublin on the first of July, when the Protestant boys used to walk round Willie's statue on College Green so if your hanner gives me the shilling, they may perhaps bring out something like it.
Page 324 - Oh, who can doubt," thought I, " that the word was originally intended for something monstrous and horrible ? Is there not something horrible in the look and sound of the word afanc, something connected with the opening and shutting of immense jaws, and the swallowing of writhing prey ? Is not the word a fitting brother of the Arabic timsah, denoting the dread horny lizard of the waters ? Moreover, have we not the voice of tradition that the afanc was something monstrous ? Does it not say that Hu...
Page 4 - Wild Wales," and he claims for Dafydd ap Gwilym, a contemporary of our Chaucer, the position of " the greatest poetical genius that has appeared in Europe since the revival of literature." At the present day there are no less than twenty weekly newspapers and about the same number of monthly magazines published in the Welsh language, besides one quarterly and two bi-monthly reviews. Abstracts of the principal Acts of Parliament and Parliamentary papers are translated into Welsh, and...
Page 571 - A mountainous wilderness extended on every side, a waste of russet coloured hills, with here and there a black, craggy summit. No signs of life or cultivation were to be discovered, and the eye might search in vain for a grove or even a single tree.
Page 514 - From the top of this hill there is a fine view of the surrounding woods and lakes, and even the sea is visible in fine weather.
Page 164 - Your hanner is an Orange man, I see. Well, your hanner, the Orange is now in the kennel, and the Croppies have it all their own way.' '"And perhaps,' said I, 'before I die, the Orange will be out of the kennel and the Croppies in, even as they were in my young days.

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