the history of virginia (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1855
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Contents

They take off the Christians that remained there and design
27
Pocahontas5 reception at court and death
33
Inferior courts in each plantation
39
The discovery and prevention of it at Jamestown
40
The occasion of the massacre
41
A plot to destroy the Indians
42
The discouraging effects of the massacre
43
The company dissolved and the colony taken into the kings hands
44
CHAPTER IV
45
Lord Baltimore in Virginia
46
Misfortune to Virginia by making Maryland a distinct govern ment
47
The last Indian massacre
48
Sir William Berkeley made governor
49
OppechancaDoughs death q
50
He binds the plantations by an act of navigation
51
Upon the death of Matthews the protectors governor Sir Wil liam Berkeley is chosen by the people
52
Sir William Berkeley makes Colonel Morrison deputy governor and goes to England
53
Encouragement of particular manufactures by law
54
Restraints upon sectaries in religion
55
An anniversary feast upon that occasion
56
S6 Another endeavor at a stint defeated
57
The disappointment of those ports
58
An attempt to discovery the country backward
59
Sir William Berkeley intends to prosecute that discovery in person
60
Four ingredients thereto
61
Third new duties by act in England on the plantations 6
62
The people rise against the Indians
63
He heads them and sends to the governor for a commission
64
The governor sends for him q
65
Bacon being marched away with his men is proclaimed rebel
66
The people there begin to make terms with him
67
The governor makes head against him
69
A new charter to Virginia
70
Commissioners arrive in Virginia and Sir William Berkeley re turns to England
71
The assembly prohibited the importation of tobacco
72
He imposes the perquisite of ship money
73
Sir Henry Chicheley deputy governor
74
The plant cutting
75
His advantage thereby in the propriety of the Northern Neck
76
He retrenches the new methods of court proceedings
77
Complaints against him
78
Colonel Bacon president
79
The assembly address King William and Queen Mary for a col lege charter
80
Gentlemen of the council complain of him and are misused
81
The college further endowed and the foundation laid
82
A child born in the old age of the parents
83
His and Colonel iuarreys memorials against plantations
84
The sham bills of nine hundred pounds for New York
86
Colonel Quarrey3s unjust memorials
87
Governor Nott arrived
88
Bounds and Coast of Virginia
90
Earths and Soils
96
Wild Fruits
102
Other fruits roots and plants of jthe Indians
114
CHAPTER VI
147
That they have different languages q 148
148
CHAPTER VII
149
Descent of the crown
150
Their treaties of peace and ceremonies upon conclusion of peace
151
CHAPTER VIII
152
Their notions of God and worshiping the evil spirit
155
Their pawwawing or conjurations
157
Their huskanawing
160
Reasons of this custom
164
Their offerings and sacrifice
165
Their superstition and zealotry q
166
Their regard to the priests and magicians
167
Places of their worship and sacrifice q
168
Their care of the bodies of their princes after death
169
Diseases and Cures of the Indians
171
Treasure or Riches of the Indians
180
BOOK IV
186
SubDivisions of Virginia
192
CHAPTER IV
200
Times of holding a general court
206
Trials by juries and empannelling grand juries
207
Trial of criminals
208
Orphans courts
209
CHAPTER VII
210
Disposition of parochial affairs
211
Probates administrations and marriage licenses
212
Induction of ministers and precariousness of their livings
213
CHAPTER VIII
214
Governors and visitors of the college in perpetual succession sd succession
215
CHAPTER IX
217
Other particulars of the troops and companies
218
CHAPTER X
219
Laws in favor of servants
222
CHAPTER XL
223
56 Tenure and patents of their lands
225
Liberties and Naturalization of Aliens
228
CHAPTER XVI
234
Occasions of its ill character
241
Annoyances or occasions of uneasiness
243
Winters
250
Sudden changes of the weather
251
82 Diseases in general
252
Seasoning
253
CHAPTER XXI
254
Verminhunting
255
Taking wild turkies
256
Horsehunting
257
Hospitality
258
CHAPTER XXII
259
Grain
261
Bees and cattle
262
Usefulness of the woods
263

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 31 - England; the first Christian ever of that Nation, the first Virginian ever spake English, or had a child in marriage by an Englishman: a matter surely, if my meaning be truly considered and well understood, worthy a Prince's understanding.
Page 110 - ... and another stark naked was sitting up in a corner, like a monkey, grinning and making mows at them...
Page 239 - Indeed, some few hides, with much ado, are tanned and made into servants' shoes; but at so careless a rate, that the planters don't care to buy them if they can get others; and sometimes, perhaps, a better manager than ordinary will vouchsafe to make a pair of breeches of a deer-skin.
Page 29 - That some ten years ago being in Virginia, and taken prisoner by the power of Powhatan their chief King, I received from this great Savage...
Page 31 - Jamestown, with her wild train, she as freely frequented as her father's habitation; and, during the time of two or three years, she, next, under God, was still the instrument to preserve this colony from death, famine, and utter confusion, which if in those times had once been dissolved, Virginia might have lain as it was at our first arrival to this day.
Page 231 - Child, that this as well as all the rest of the plantations, was for the most part at first peopled by persons of low circumstances, and by such as were willing to seek their fortunes in a foreign country. Nor was it hardly possible it should be otherwise ; for 'tis not likely that any man of a plentiful estate should voluntarily abandon a happy certainty, to roam after imaginary advantages, in a new world.
Page 158 - ... and a rattle in his hand. With most strange gestures and passions he began his invocation, and environed the fire with a circle of meale...
Page 151 - King stood in the middest guarded, as before is said, and after three dances they all departed. Smith they conducted to a long house, where...
Page 185 - ... arrival of the Europeans, by whose means they seem to have lost their Felicity, as well as their Innocence. The English have taken away great part of their Country, and consequently made every thing less plenty amongst them. They have introduc'd Drunkenness and Luxury amongst them, which have multiply'd their Wants, and put them upon desiring a thousand things, they never dreamt of before.
Page 113 - ... the Meat of a Carnation, and the Seed black, and shining, while it lies in the Melon. 3. Their Pompions I need not describe, but must say they are much larger and finer than any I ever heard of in England. 4. Their Cushaws are a kind of Pompion, of a bluish green Colour streaked with White, when they are fit for Use. They are larger than the Pompions, and have a long narrow Neck: Perhaps this may be the Ecushaw of T.

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