Sinister street (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1915 - Fiction - 658 pages
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User Review  - Philip_Lee - LibraryThing

“Sinister Street” a bildungsroman by Compton Mackenzie I read the first hundred pages of this gigantic novel in awe that its sparkling text could have been written over a hundred years ago. Mirroring ... Read full review

Review: Sinister Street

User Review  - Heath - Goodreads

A well-written and languorously evocative bildungsroman of a turn-of-the-century Englishman of private means. Compton Mackenzie was one of Waugh's favorite authors, which initially inspired me to pick ... Read full review

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Page 35 - You have come to Oxford, (...) some of you to hunt foxes, some of you to wear very large and very unusual overcoats, some of you to row for your college, and a few of you to work. But all of you have come to Oxford to remain English gentlemen.
Page 222 - I'm so positive that the best of Oxford is the best of England, and that the best of England is the best of humanity that I long to apply to the world the same standards we tacitly respect — we undergraduates. I believe every problem of life can be solved by the transcendency of the spirit which has transcended us up here." 158 The English University Novel "I think you have a great capacity for idealization,
Page 97 - ... following quotation from Sinister Street, describing the tranquility of life on the river, will amply illustrate: " There, as one lay at ease, the world became a world of tall-growing grass and the noise of life no more than a river's lapping, or along the level meadows the faint sibillance of a wind. This was the season when supper was eaten by figures in silhouette against the sunset, figures that afterwards drifted slowly down to college under the treeentangled stars and flitting, assiduous...
Page 653 - All that I have done and experienced so far would not scratch this stone. I have been concerned for the happiness of other people without gratitude for the privilege of service. I have been given knowledge and I fancied I was given disillusion. If now I offer myself to God very humbly, I give myself to the service of...
Page 373 - ... the left. The hansom clattered through the murk beneath, past the dim people huddled upon the pavement, past a wheel-barrow and the obscene skeletons and outlines of humanity chalked upon the arches of sweating brick. Here then was Kentish Town. It lay to the left of this bridge that was the colour of stale blood. Michael told the driver to stop for one moment, and he leaned forward over the apron of the cab to survey the cross-street of swarming feculent humanity that was presumably the entering...
Page 656 - Many critics have persisted in regarding Sinister Street merely as an achievement of memory . . . you know from many hours of talk that, if I were to set down all I could remember of my childhood, the book would not by this time have reached much beyond my fifth year".
Page 613 - ... Satyricon when it appeared in translation in a Modern Library edition. He was certainly interested in it when he came to the writing of The Great Gatsby. (See Paul L. MacKendrick, "The Great Gatsby and Trimalchio," Classical Journal, April 1950.) too. After all, what is life for me? Strange dross in strange houses. Strange men and strange intimacies. Scenes incredibly grotesque and incredibly beastly. The secret vileness of human nature flung at me. Man revealing himself through individual after...
Page 657 - My intention, however, was not to write a life, but the prologue of a life. He is growing up on the last page, and for me his interest begins to fade. He may have before him a thousand new adventures; he may become a Benedictine monk: he may become a society preacher. I have given you as fully as I could the various influences that went to mold him."39 The increasing interest in the process, in "becoming...
Page 372 - ... mystery and gruesomeness were essential attributes. The drive was for a long time tediously pleasant in the June sunshine; but when the cab had crossed the junction of the Euston Road with the Tottenham Court Road, unknown London with all its sly and labyrinthine romance lured his fancy onwards . . . Presently upon an iron railway bridge Michael read in giant letters the direction Kentish Town behind a huge leprous hand pointing to the left. The hansom clattered through the murk beneath, past...
Page 657 - was not to write a life, but the prologue of a life. He is growing up on the last page, and his interest for me is beginning to fade. He may have before him a thousand new adventures; he may become a Benedictine monk ; he may become a society preacher. I have given you as fairly as I could the influences that went to mould him.

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