One Renegade Cell: How Cancer Begins

Front Cover
Basic Books, 1999 - Medical - 170 pages
10 Reviews
One of the leading cancer researchers in the world, Robert A. Weinberg is perfectly suited to describe the search for cancer's origins from the early days of this century to the present. Presuming little knowledge of biology, he tells how a cancer-causing virus was first discovered in 1909, how the correlation was made between chemical carcinogens and cancer, and how oncogenes (the genes that can turn a cell malignant) work. He explains clearly how malignant cells send messages to one another and also block the messages of normal cells. Finally, Weinberg predicts that cancer prevention may depend on our ability to understand the mysterious chemical clock that regulates our cells' most basic functions. One Renegade Cell offers a concise, accessible route into the complex and often daunting world of cancer and cancer research.

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Review: One Renegade Cell: The Quest For The Origin Of Cancer

User Review  - Igor Faynshteyn - Goodreads

A concise and well-written overview of the history of cancer by one of the most prominent cancer researchers alive. Read full review

Review: One Renegade Cell: The Quest For The Origin Of Cancer

User Review  - Manar - Goodreads

Very interesting way of describing the advance of cancer research. I enjoyed reading the book so much Read full review

About the author (1999)

A Founding Member of Whitehead Institute, Robert A. Weinberg is a pioneer in cancer research most widely known for his discoveries of the first human oncogene - a gene that causes normal cells to form tumors - and the first tumor suppressor gene. Weinberg, who received his PhD in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1969, has held research positions at the Weizmann Institute and the Salk Institute. In 1982, Weinberg helped found Whitehead Institute, joinedthe faculty as a professor of biology at MIT, and published his landmark paper "Mechanism of Activation of a Human Oncogene" in the journal Nature. In 1999, another major paper, "Creation of Human Tumor Cells with Defined Genetic Elements," was also published in Nature.

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