Everyday Classics: Primer-eighth Reader, Book 5 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1917 - Readers
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Page 124 - Came through the jaws of death, Back from the mouth of hell, All that was left of them, Left of six hundred. When can their glory fade? Oh, the wild charge they made! All the world wondered. Honor the charge they made, Honor the Light Brigade, Noble six hundred!
Page 187 - twixt my knees on the ground ; And no voice but was praising this Roland of mine, As I poured down his throat our last measure of wine, Which (the burgesses voted by common consent) Was no more than his due who brought good news from Ghent.
Page 249 - AND it came to pass, when he had made an end of speaking unto Saul, that the soul of Jonathan was knit with the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul.
Page 206 - So through the night rode Paul Revere ; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm, A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo forevermore...
Page 203 - And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height A glimmer, and then a gleam of light! He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns, But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight A second lamp in the belfry burns!
Page 186 - for Aix is in sight !" "How they'll greet us!" and all in a moment his roan Rolled neck and croup over, lay dead as a stone; And there was my Roland to bear the whole weight Of the news which alone could save Aix from her fate, With his nostrils like pits full of blood to the brim, And with circles of red for his eye-sockets
Page 201 - If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light, One, if by land, and two, if by sea ; And I on the opposite shore will be, Ready to ride and spread the alarm Through every Middlesex village and farm, For the country folk to be up and to arm.
Page 200 - Ay, call it holy ground, The soil where first they trod ; They have left unstained what there they found Freedom to worship God.
Page 195 - How sleep the brave, who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest ! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.
Page 156 - Nay, not so." Replied the Angel. Abou spoke more low, But cheerly still; and said, "I pray thee, then, Write me as one that loves his fellow-men." The Angel wrote and vanished. The next night It came again with a great wakening light, And showed the names whom love of God had blessed, And lo ! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest.

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