The poetical works of John Milton: with the life of the author, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Fielding Lucas, Jun., and Joseph Cushing, 1813 - 565 pages
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Page 193 - Yet when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute she seems And in herself complete; so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best...
Page 219 - So saying, her rash hand in evil hour Forth reaching to the Fruit, she pluck'd, she eat: Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe, That all was lost.
Page 3 - OF Man's First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal taste Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav'nly Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav'ns and Earth Rose out of Chaos...
Page 10 - What matter where, if I be still the same, And what I should be, all but less than he Whom thunder hath made greater? Here at least We shall be free...
Page 111 - Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing; ye in Heaven, On earth join, all ye creatures, to extol Him first, him last, him midst, and without end.
Page 305 - Began to parch that temperate clime ; whereat In either hand the hast'ning angel caught Our ling'ring parents, and to th' eastern gate Led them direct, and down the cliff as fast To the subjected plain ; then disappear'd. 640 They looking back, all th...
Page 50 - The secrets of the hoary deep ; a dark Illimitable ocean, without bound, Without dimension; where length, breadth, and height, And time, and place, are lost ; where eldest Night And Chaos, ancestors of Nature, hold Eternal anarchy, amidst the noise Of endless wars, and by confusion stand.
Page 6 - This downfall : since by fate the strength of gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail ; Since through experience of this great event In arms not worse, in foresight much...
Page 111 - These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine.
Page 79 - He brings, and round about him, nor from Hell One step, no more than from himself, can fly By change of place.

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