The Medical Knowledge of Shakespeare (Google eBook)

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Longman, 1860 - Medicine in literature - 292 pages
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Page 212 - Caesar carelessly but nod on him. He had a fever when he was in Spain, And when the fit was on him, I did mark How he did shake...
Page 198 - Cure her of that: Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd : Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow : Raze out the written troubles of the brain; And, with some sweet oblivious antidote, Cleanse the stuff d bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart?
Page 83 - Why, that's the way to choke a gibing spirit, Whose influence is begot of that loose grace Which shallow laughing hearers give to fools : A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it...
Page 94 - Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die? and if you wrong us, shall we not revenge?
Page 101 - They say miracles are past ; and we have our philosophical persons to make modern and familiar things supernatural and causeless. Hence is it, that we make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge, when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear.
Page 273 - The Moor already changes with my poison : Dangerous conceits are in their natures poisons, Which at the first are scarce found to distaste, But with a little act upon the blood, Burn like the mines of sulphur.
Page 107 - Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty: For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo The means of weakness and debility; Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man In all your business and necessities.
Page 271 - tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our wills are gardeners...
Page 80 - But love, first learned in a lady's eyes, Lives not alone immured in the brain; But, with the motion of all elements, Courses as swift as thought in every power, And gives to every power a double power, Above their functions and their offices.
Page 155 - It ascends me into the brain ; dries me there all the foolish, and dull, and crudy vapours which environ it : makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble, fiery, and delectable shapes ; which delivered o'er to the voice, (the tongue,) which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.

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