Babe: The Life and Legend of Babe Didrikson Zaharias

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 1996 - Biography & Autobiography - 327 pages
1 Review
One of the most gifted athletes of all time, Babe Didrikson Zaharias dominated track and field, winning two Olympic gold medals and a controversial silver in 1932 before going on to compete in baseball, bowling, basketball, tennis, and particularly in golf. An American public smitten with her wit, frankness, and "unladylike" bravado helped her become an American legend. In Babe, Susan Cayleff offers a comprehensive, in-depth biography of a woman who was a great athlete at a time when women's roles and opportunities were severely limited. Through interviews with Babe's friends and family, golf peers, and medical personnel, Cayleff sensitively reveals the life and probes the legend of this unusual American hero. Included is a for-the-record discussion of the remarkable love Babe shared with Betty Dodd, the young golfer who was her constant companion in her last years. Stricken with cancer in her prime, Babe went public as a self-help role model able to beat the disease. Her bravery further endeared her to the American public.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

never read it but BABE RLES

Contents

III
27
IV
50
VI
78
VIII
99
X
113
XII
134
XIII
157
XIV
179
XV
197
XVI
218
XVII
243
XVIII
267
XIX
311
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page viii - What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open...
Page 5 - And, above all other prohibitions, what has been forbidden to women is anger, together with the open admission of the desire for power and control over one's life (which inevitably means accepting some degree of power and control over other lives).
Page 12 - Games must be reserved for men. . . . [We] must continue to try to achieve the following definition: the solemn and periodic exaltation of male athleticism, with internationalism as a base, loyalty as a means, art for its setting, and female applause as its reward.
Page xii - Hershey; the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston; the Harvard University Program on Technology and Society;2 and the Harvard Interfaculty Program in Medical Ethics.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information