Gaslight Sonatas (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1918 - 270 pages
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Page 107 - Almost, ma." Are you all right? " Fine." You — you ain't mad at mamma? " Course not, dearie." "I — thought it sounded like you was crying." "Why, mommy, course not! Turn over now and go to sleep." Another hour, and suddenly Mrs. Kaufman shot out her arm from the coverlet, jerking back the sheet and feeling for her daughter's dewy, upturned face where the tears were slashing down it.
Page 33 - The poor exemption boobs are already running for doctors' certificates and marriage licenses, but even if they get by with it — and it is ninety-nine to one they won't — they can't run away from their own degradation and shame." " Come on, Jimmie." " Wait." " Men of America, for every one of you who tries to dodge his duty to his country there is a yellow streak somewhere underneath the hide of you. Women of America, every one of you that helps to foster the spirit of cowardice in your particular...
Page 103 - Oh, my God," said Mrs. Kaufman, drawing her hand across her brow. " His uncle Meyer, ma, 's been hinting all along he — he's going to give Leo his start and take him in the business. That's why we — we're waiting without saying much, till it looks more like — like we can all be together, ma." " All my dreams! My dreams I could give up the house! My baby with a well-to-do husband maybe on Riverside Drive. A servant for herself, so I could pass maybe Mrs. Suss and Mrs. Katz by on the street....
Page 81 - ... story for story, and ash can for ash can, there were few enough greasy odors except upon the weekly occasion of Monday's boiled dinner; and, whatever the status of liver and dried peaches, canned corn and round steak, her menus remained static — so static that in the gas-lighted basement dining room and at a remote end of the long, wellsurrounded table, Mrs. Katz, with her napkin tucked well under her third chin, turned sotto from the protruding husband at her right to her left neighbor, shielding...
Page 97 - And, honest, his — his whole family is just that way. Sweet-like and generous. Wait till you see the way his sister and brother-inlaw will treat us at the hotel to-morrow. And — and Leo, too." "I always say the day what Meyer Vetsburg, when he was only a clerk in the firm, answered my furnished-room advertisement was the luckiest day in my life.
Page 85 - em, and he should got to sit at the same table without cranberries." From the head of the table the flashing implements of carving held in askance for stroke, her lips lifted to a smile and a simulation of interest for display of further carnivorous appetites, Mrs. Kaufman passed her nod from one to the other. "Miss Arndt, little more? No? Mr. Krakower? Gravy? Mrs. Suss? Mr. Suss? So! Simon? Mr. Schloss? Miss Horowitz? Mr. Vetsburg, let me give you this little tender — No? Then, Ruby, here let...
Page 96 - Markovitches' hotel, ma dearie, right near the Boardwalk, and the grandest glassed-in porch and — and chairs, and — and nooks and things. Ain't they, Vetsy? " " Yes, you little Ruby, you," he said, regarding her with warm, insinuating eyes, even crinkling an eyelid in a wink. She did not return the glance, but caught her cheeks in the vise of her hands as if to stem the too-quick flush. " Now you — you quit! " she cried, flashing her back upon him in quick pink confusion. " She gets mad yet,"...
Page 94 - Miss Kaufman flashed her vivid face toward Mr. Vetsburg, still low there in his chair. She was trembling. "Vetsy knows! He's the only one in this house does know! He 'ain't been here with us ten years, ever since we started in this big house, not — not to know he's the only one thinks you're here for anything except impudence and running stairs and standing sass from the bad boys of lazy mothers. You know, don't you, Vetsy?" ' ' Ruby ! Mr. Vetsburg, you — you must excuse — ' ' From the depths...
Page 93 - I just sat and looked at them there at supper just now, and I said to myself, I said, to think they drown kittens and let those poor lumps live!" "Ruby, ain't you ashamed to talk like that?" "Sat there and looked at poor old man Katz with his ear all ragged like it had been chewed off, and wondered why he didn't just go down to Brooklyn Bridge for a high jump.

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