The Modern Part of an Universal History: From the Earliest Account of Time. Compiled from Original Writers. By the Authors of The Antient Part (Google eBook)

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S. Richardson, T. Osborne, C. Hitch, A. Millar, John Rivington, S. Crowder, P. Davey and B. Law, T. Longman, and C. Ware, 1760
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Page 378 - Their priefts pretend to a familiarity with the devil, and the art of penetrating into futurity by means of a pot pierced at the bottom in three different places, from which they extract a difmal noife, the oracle of their feigned correfpondent, which they interpret as they pleafe. Nyendael alleges, that every man is his own prieft ; but this not only contradicts what he affirms in another place, but runs counter to the affertions of Barbot and the beft authorities. Nothing, according to Barbot,...
Page 66 - B.XVIL with fome fruits, roots, and other fpontaneous vegetables, rather than debafe their nobility by joining their hands to the plough or fpade. And on the fame account they neglect the breeding of cattle of any kind, how profitable foever they might prove to them, and allege, that it is too much below their dignity to take the care of...
Page 86 - Kongo formerly obliged a petitioner for an inveftiture, tho' a count, duke, or prince of the royal blood, to approach the throne not only in the cringing fuppliant guife above defcribed, but with his face, head, and fhoulders, covered with an ordinary veil, befprinkled all over with duft and dirt, in token of the deepeft abafement d ; which laft piece of ftate feems now wholly...
Page 399 - IH11 more profound refpect, the clapping together of both hands. When perfons of equal condition meet, they each fall down, clap their hands, and mutually falute ; the fame ceremonies being nicely obferved and imitated by their feveral attendants, a whole retinue of...
Page 399 - ... in which he then happens to be, by gently clapping his hand, and wifhing him the fame. The other all this while remains fitting, or proftrate on the earth, till the fuperior departs, unlefs fome urgent bufinefs calls him, in which cafe he makes his apology in the moft fubmiffive terms. The fame...
Page 414 - ... in refufing to comply. After they have perfuaded the girl into their opinion, they order her to embrace the opportunity at night, when the way is clear, and immediately fall a fcreaming and howling, as if the fnake had laid hold of her, and was carrying her off. Before relief can arrive, the fnake is...
Page 401 - They are neither permitted to go abroad, mtn> but in company with their hufbands, and clofe fhut up in their Hamars, nor can they receive any male vifitors at home. Upon the leaft jealoufy or fufpicion, they are fold by their hufbands to the Europeans. If in this country one perfon debauches the wife of another, he muft himfelf not only fufrer death, but his whole family are involved in the confequences of his guilt.
Page 368 - The women, on the other hand, ufe great art indreffing their hai>-, which they throw into a variety of different forms, great and fmall buckles, high and low foretops, fometimes plaited up behind, at other times flowing in wanton ringlets down the neck ; but generally divided on the crown of tha head, by which means the curls are brought into exaft order and form. Some anoint it with a kind of oil they exprefs or roaft out of oil nuts, whence it lofes its black colour, and in procefs of time turns...
Page 85 - ... claim. The very difgrace of being thus caft away, would be looked upon as one of the greateft misfortunes that could befall a man of quality : but this is not all ; the populace, emulous to exprefs their zeal for their prince, lay violent hands on the obnoxious " perfons, drag them off without mercy or regard, tear their cloaths off their backs, and treat them with fuch variety 0{ outrages and indignities, that many of them lofe their lives' efP"~ before they can get out of the numerous crowd....
Page 68 - ... deferving he was of a worfe fate than that he complained of. He coldly told them, that he had done nothing but what had been conftantly praftifed in that country, and there could be no crime in reducing them to the flavifh condition to which he himfelf had run the rift of being reduced by them (4). It will not be amifs to be obferved here, that tho...

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