A Descriptive Catalogue of the Raptorial Birds in the Norfolk and Norwich Museum, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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John Van Voorst, 1864 - Falconidae - 90 pages
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Page v - In compiling the first portion of a Catalogue of the Raptorial Birds in the Norfolk and Norwich Museum (which I hope at a future time may be followed by the remainder), I have considered it desirable, in the first place, to give a list of the several species contained in the collection, in the order in which they are there arranged (that order being such as has appeared to me to be, on ihe whole, the most conformable to their natural affinities).
Page 22 - Polyborinfe of America. The Milvago leucurus is a noisy bird, and utters several harsh cries, of which one is so like that of the English rook that the sealers always call it by this name. It is a curious circumstance, as showing how, in allied species, small details of habit accompany similar structure, that these hawks throw their heads upwards and backwards in the same strange manner as the carranchas (the tharu of Molina) have been described to do.
Page 23 - ... sheep's wool in it. The eggs are laid the first week in November, and are generally two, sometimes three, in number. In a nest that I once robbed of three eggs, on going to it again about a week later, I was surprised to find two more laid, one of which was a very light-coloured one. * * * * I once had my cap knocked off by this bird while taking its eggs, and had it not been for a friendly piece of tussac growing near, I should have fallen into the sea from the perpendicular cliff where the...
Page 42 - CATHARTES JOTA, (Molina.) This species, though nearly related to the North American Cathartes aura, constantly presents characters very probably sufficient to constitute specific distinction. It is apparently, or so far as can be ascertained from prepared specimens, a more slender bird, and longer in all its measurements. The last character is particularly applicable to the wings. Of several specimens of this Vulture in the collection of the Expedition, those labelled as females are invariably the...
Page 83 - One contained five bullock's ribs two inches thick and from six to nine long, a lump of hair, and the leg of a young goat from the knee to the foot; the bones were perforated by the gastric juice and partly reduced to powder ; but the most abundant feast was found in the stomach of a Leemmer-Geyer, killed by Dr.
Page 43 - JOTA, (Molina.) This species, though nearly related to the North American Cathartes aura, constantly presents characters very probably sufficient to constitute specific distinction. It is apparently, or so far as can be ascertained from prepared specimens, a more slender bird, and longer in all its measurements. The last character is particularly applicable to the wings. Of several specimens of this Vulture in the collection of the Expedition, those labelled as females are invariably the smaller....
Page 20 - Islands, and on some others, but never on the main land of Tierra del Fuego. This statement I can corroborate to a certain degree, as I never saw one in the southern part of Tierra del Fuego, near Cape Horn, which was twice visited during our voyage. They are not found on Georgia or on the other antarctic islands.
Page 46 - ... well-kept than the latter. The YELLOW-NECKED CARRION CROW. This bird is smaller and more slender than the common Carrion Crow. It is found principally about the creeks of Mahaica and Mahaicony. It is less numerous than the Black-headed Carrion Crow. It is not either so gregarious a feeder, and appears to search for smaller carcases, such as the putrid fish on the dried savannahs bordering the creeks. There is certainly, with the exception of the colour of the head and neck, the absence of warts,...
Page 22 - I found at least fifteen nests along the cliffs of the north shore, all these had two young ones in them covered with down of a light yellow colour. The nest is generally composed of the dead fibres of the tussac grass, and frequently...
Page 63 - This bird is a constant resident in the Sahara, though in very limited numbers, while the Griffon breeds throughout the Atlas, the Nubian seems to resort to more southern ranges for his eyrie. There is a breeding place in the south-west of Bishra, in some lofty isolated cliffs ; and another near the stupendous gorge of El Kantara.

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