Heart of the West (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Doubleday, Doran, 1913 - West (U.S.) - 311 pages
5 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
1
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - andyray - LibraryThing

HIS IS THE FIRST I HAVE tried of O HENRY's works, but not the last, I assure you. nown for his fast-draw and die endings the last paragraph or line , he also blends thestyle of two humourists together ... Read full review

Review: Heart of the West

User Review  - Evyn Charles - Goodreads

I am just now "discovering" O. Henry, who is well-known for being the most popular American short story writer ever. I won't even attempt a detailed description, let's just say his reputation is ... Read full review

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 54 - is statistics more wonderful than any poem. The rings show it was sixty years old. At the depth of two thousand feet it would become coal in three thousand years. The deepest coal mine in the world is at Killingworth, near Newcastle. A box four feet long, three feet wide, and two feet eight inches deep will hold one ton of coal. If an artery is cut, compress it above the wound. A man's leg contains thirty bones. The Tower of London was burned in l84l." "Go on, Mr. Pratt,
Page 290 - Fairy Tales," which Uncle Leo gave me. It did not hurt any one for me to read the book. I try to work as well as I can, but there is so much to do. I read only a little bit every night. Dear Mamma, I shall tell you what I am going to do. Unless you send for me to-morrow to bring me home I shall go to a deep place I know in the river and drown. It is wicked to drown, I suppose, but I wanted to see you, and there is no one else. I am very tired, and Tommy is waiting for the letter. You will excuse...
Page 290 - At 10 : 30 o'clock old man Ballinger came out of his house in his stocking feet and leaned over the gate, smoking his pipe. He looked down the big road, white in the moonshine, and rubbed one ankle with the toe of his other foot. It was time for the Fredericksburg mail to come pattering up the road. Old man Ballinger had waited only a few minutes when he heard the lively...
Page 300 - How can we ever thank you enough?" "Tell mamma how you came in Fritz's wagon," said Frau Hildesmuller. "I don't know," said Lena. "But I know how I got away from the hotel. The Prince brought me." "By the Emperor's crown!" shouted Fritz, "we are all going crazy." "I always knew he would come," said Lena, sitting down on her bundle of bedclothes on the sidewalk. "Last night he came with his armed knights and captured the ogre's castle. They broke the dishes and kicked down the doors. They pitched...
Page 290 - Ballinger came out of his house in his stocking feet and leaned over the gate, smoking his pipe. He looked down the big road, white in the moonshine, and rubbed one ankle with the toe of his other foot. It was time for the Fredericksburg mail to come pattering up the road. Old man Ballinger had waited only a few minutes when he heard the lively hoofbeats of Fritz's team of little black mules, and very soon afterward his covered spring wagon stood in front of the gate. Fritz's big spectacles flashed...
Page 129 - Mexican, suddenly stirring, ventilated his attitude of apathetic waiting by conjuring swiftly froin his bootleg a long knife. Buckley cast aside his hat, and laughed once aloud, like a happy school-boy at a frolic. Then, emptyhanded, he sprang nimbly, and Garcia met him without default. So soon was the engagement ended that disappointment imposed upon the ranger's war-like ecstasy. Instead of dealing the traditional downward stroke, the Mexican lunged straight with his knife. Buckley took the precarious...
Page 294 - He's not so much of a skunk, for a Dutchman. Took up for his animile plum quick, didn't he ? I like to see a man like his boss, even if it is a mule. The dad-blamed little Limburger he went for me, didn't he ! Whoa, now, muley I ain't a-goin' to hurt your mouth agin any more.
Page 9 - I was sure you'd come. You saw the sign?' she whispers. 'The minute I hit camp,' says I. "Twas marked on the bag of potatoes and onions.' 'They're always together,' says she, soft like 'always together in life.' 'They go well together,' I says, 'in a stew.' 'I mean hearts and crosses,' says Santa. 'Our sign to love and to suffer that's what they mean.' "And there was old Doc Musgrove amusin* himself with whisky and a palm-leaf fan. And by and by Santa goes to sleep; and Doc feels her...
Page 292 - It is due to the breadth of Hondo Bill's demerit and the largeness of his achievements to state that the holding up of the Fredericksburg mail was not perpetrated by way of an exploit.
Page 288 - And always when the extremity was direst came the good fairy or the gallant prince to the rescue. So, here in the ogre's castle, enslaved by a wicked spell, Lena had leaned upon Grimm and waited, longing for the powers of goodness to prevail. But on the day before Mrs. Maloney had found the book in her room and had carried it away, declaring sharply that it would not do for servants to read at night; they lost sleep and did not work briskly the next day. Can one only eleven years old, living away...

Bibliographic information