Food and Gender in Fiji: Ethnoarchaeological Explorations

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Lexington Books, 2009 - Social Science - 205 pages
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Food and Gender in Fiji is an ethnoarchaeological investigation of the social relations surrounding foodways on the island of Nayau in Fiji. Writing from the perspective of an archaeologist, Jones answers questions raised by her archaeological research using original ethnographic data and material culture associated women and fishing, the intersection that forms the basis of the subsistence economy on Nayau. She focuses on food procurement on the reef, domestic activities surrounding foodways, and household spatial patterns to explore the meaning of food amongst the Lau Group of Fiji beyond the obvious nutritional and ecological spheres. Jones presents her findings alongside original archaeological data, demonstrating that it is possible to illuminate contemporary food-related social issues through historical homology and comparison with the lifeways of the Lauan people. Offering a comprehensive and rigorous example of ethnoarchaeology at work, this book has major implications for archaeological interpretations of foodways, gender, identity, and social organization in the Pacific Islands and beyond.
  

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Contents

Motivations Plans and Realities
1
The Lau Islands Fiji
16
Chapter 3 Foodways and Social Relations in the Past and Present
45
Chapter 4 Food Consumption Patterns and Refuse Disposal
102
Chapter 5 Lauan Fishing
116
Chapter 6 Food in the Lau Islands and Its Implications for Ethnoarchaeology and Archaeology
137
Archaeological Methods
151
Structured Ethnographic Interviews Conducted on Nayau October and November 2003
155
Bibliography
191
Index
201
About the Author
205
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Sharyn Jones is assistant professor in anthropology at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.

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