A political economy of agricultural markets in South India: masters of the countryside

Front Cover
Sage Publications, Aug 19, 1996 - Business & Economics - 425 pages
0 Reviews
Market deregulation in Indian agriculture has been recently justified on the grounds that agricultural markets are competitive and efficient. This book explains why the assumption is incorrect and why deregulation may be dangerous both for efficiency and equity. Using extensive field research into the marketing system for five major commodities, and applying an approach grounded in institutional economics and political economy, author Barbara Harriss-White examines the technological and logistical systems defining agricultural markets. She analyzes the connections between money, labor, and land in agricultural markets, stressing the way in which power is institutionalized. In addition, A Political Economy of Agricultural Markets in South India reveals the roles of rent-seeking, tax evasion, and criminal activity in these complex systems. The analysis is historically grounded and provides policy options for regulation, technology, and employment under contemporary conditions of market reforms. A Political Economy of Agricultural Markets in South India will prove useful to students, scholars, and professionals in economics, agricultural economics, political economy, sociology, agricultural technology, and labor studies.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Case for a Political Economy of Markets
20
Field Methods and Data
54
Agrarian Structure in Coimbatore District South India
63
Copyright

14 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Barbara Harriss-White is Professor of Development Studies at Queen Elizabeth House, and Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford.

Bibliographic information