The Economic Importance of Insects

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Springer Science & Business Media, 1997 - Medical - 395 pages
2 Reviews
In the last few decades there has been an ever-increasing component in most BSc Zoology degree courses of cell biology, physiology and genetics, for spectacular developments have taken place in these fields. Some aspects of biotechnology are now also being included. In order to accommodate the new material, the old zoology courses were altered and the traditional two-year basis of systematics of the animal kingdom, comparative anatomy (and physiology) and evolution, was either severely trimmed or reduced and presented in an abridged form under another title. Soon after these course alterations came the swing to modular teaching in the form of a series of shorter, separate courses, some of which were optional. The entire BSc degree course took on a different appearance and several different basic themes became possible. One major result was that in the great majority of cases taxonomy and systematics were no longer taught and biology students graduated without this basic training. We field biologists did appreciate the rising interest in ecology and environ mental studies, but at the same time lamented the shortage of taxonomic skills, so that often field work was based on incorrect identifications. For years many of us with taxonomic inclinations have been bedevilled by the problem of teaching systematics to undergraduates. At a guess, maybe only 5% of students find systematics interesting. It is, however, the very basis of all studies in biology - the correct identification of the organism concerned and its relationships to others in the community.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
BENEFICIAL INSECTS
7
22 APICULTURE
14
23 SERICULTURE
21
24 INSECT FARMING
23
25 NATURAL CONTROL OF PESTS
29
26 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF PESTS
33
27 INSECTS IN NATURAL FOOD WEBS
42
52 VETERINARY PESTS
93
53 HOUSEHOLD AND STORED PRODUCTS PESTS
106
54 AGRICULTURAL PESTS
142
55 FORESTRY PESTS
244
INSECT PEST CONTROL
333
61 LEGISLATION
334
62 PHYSICAL METHODS
337
63 CULTURAL CONTROL
340

28 INSECTS AS HUMAN FOOD
45
29 MISCELLANEOUS
47
PEST DEFINITIONS
51
32 DEVELOPMENT OF PEST STATUS
54
DAMAGE CAUSED BY INSECTA AND ACARINA
65
42 DIRECT DAMAGE
68
43 HOST VULNERABILITY
69
44 DAMAGE ASSESSMENT
73
HARMFUL INSECTS
77
64 BREEDINGGENETIC METHODS
344
65 BIOLOGICAL CONTROL BIOCONTROL
346
66 CHEMICAL CONTROL
349
67 IPM
355
68 PEST ERADICATION
356
GLOSSARY
359
REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING
379
INDEX
385
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Dennis S. Hill is an English zoologist specializing in entomology, with considerable experience in agricultural entomology. His B.Sc. and MSc. degrees are from Hull University and his Ph.D. is from Hong Kong University. He has studied insects and lectured on entomology, ecology, and other subjects in diverse locations around the world. His published works include 14 books, 35 research papers, and numerous reports, reviews, and articles. Hill has also developed advisory literature and teaching manuals dealing with insects, crop pests, and community ecology.

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