The Arabic, Hebrew and Latin Reception of Avicenna's Metaphysics (Google eBook)

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Dag Nikolaus Hasse, Amos Bertolacci
Walter de Gruyter, Dec 23, 2011 - Philosophy - 398 pages
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Avicenna’s Metaphysics (in Arabic Ilâhiyyât) is one of the most important metaphysical treatises after Aristotle. This volume presents studies on its direct and indirect influenceon Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin culture from the early 11th through the 16th century. Among the philosophical topics which receive particular attention are the distinction between essence and existence, the theory of universals, the concept of God as the necessary being, and the theory of emanation. The studies also address the philological and historical circumstances of the textual tradition in three medieval cultures.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
AlLawkarīls Reception of Ibn Sīnās Ilāhiyyāt
7
A Sketch
27
Averroes against Avicenna on Being and Unity
51
Avicenna and his Commentators on Human and Divine SelfIntellection
97
Essence and Existence ThirteenthCentury Perspectives in ArabicIslamic Philosophy and Theology ...
123
Avicennas Metaphysics in the Medieval Hebrew Philosophical Tradition
153
Abraham Ibn Daud and Avicenna on Evil
159
Avicennas Giver of Forms in Latin Philosophy Especially in the Works of Albertus Magnus ...
225
Avicenna and Aquinas on Form and Generation
251
Immateriality and Separation in Avicenna and Thomas Aquinas
275
Two Senses of Common Avicennas Doctrine of Essence and Aquinass View on Individuation ...
309
On the Latin Reception of Avicennas Theory of Individuation
339
Scotus and Avicenna on What it is to Be a Thing
365
Index of Avicennas Works with Passages Cited
389
Index of Names
395

Possible Hebrew Quotations of the Metaphysical Section of Avicennas Oriental Philosophy and Their Historical Meaning ...
177
An Attempt at Periodization
197

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About the author (2011)

Dag Nikolaus Hasse, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Germany; Amos Bertolacci, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy.

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