A Child's Garden of Verses

Front Cover
Robert Louis Stevenson
Dover Publications, 1992 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 88 pages
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Scottish novelist, poet and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson dedicated "A Child's Garden of Verses" to Alison Cunningham, the nurse of his early childhood years in Edinburgh--a time whose essence he strove to recapture in the sixty-four poems of this long-treasured collection. Here, in "The Land of Counterpane" and "The Land of Nod, " and in such delightful lyrics as "My Bed Is a Boat, " "Autumn Fires" and "Windy Nights, " are rhymes and images children and their parents have cherished together since "A Child's Garden of Verses" was first published in 1885.

Alternately humorous and whimsical, grave and fearful, courageous and determined, the poems touchingly voice the many moods and currents of a child's imaginings. All sixty-four poems are reprinted in this edition in large, easy-to-read type. New illustrations by Thea Kliros capture the magical spirit of this beloved classic of children's literature.

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User Review  - savvyshopper48 - Overstock.com

I purchased this to share with my grandchildren. I remember my Mother reciting and reading these poems to my brothers and I when we were young. I thought they were magical then, and I still do. I ... Read full review

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User Review  - Deborah Harris - Goodreads

AR Quiz No. 19095 EN Nonfiction Accelerated Reader Quiz Information IL: LG - BL: 3.4 - AR Pts: 0.5 Accelerated Reader Quiz Type Information AR Quiz Types: RP Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

Thea Kliros grew up in New York City. She attended Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont, and the Yale School of Design. First a painter and then a graphic artist, she has lived in Spain, Switzerland, and New York City. Her work includes the children's book, Three Little Pigs.

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