The Edinburgh Literary Journal: Or, Weekly Register of Criticism and Belles Lettres, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Ballantyne, 1829 - Wandering Jew
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Vol. 2 includes "The poet Shelley--his unpublished work, T̀he wandering Jew'" (p. 43-45, [57]-60)
  

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Page 203 - Lord I am coming as fast as I can ; I know I must pass through the shadow of death before I can come to see thee ; but it is but umbra mortis, a mere shadow of death, a little darkness upon nature ; but thou by thy merits and passion hast broke through the jaws of death.
Page 203 - Wherefore, seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us ; and let us run with patience the race which is set before us...
Page 4 - O thou once free, And always fair, rare land of courtesy ! O Florence ! with the Tuscan fields and hills, And famous Arno, fed with all their rills ; Thou brightest star of star-bright Italy ! Rich, ornate, populous, all treasures thine, The golden corn, the olive, and the vine.
Page 261 - Frank seized his double-barreled gun, and Lincoln his pistols. The former placed the muzzle within a few inches of the tiger, and Lincoln did the same. At Wharton's command, they both drew the triggers at the same moment ; but no shot followed. The tiger, who seemed aware that the flash indicated an attack upon him, sprang, growling, from the entrance ; but feeling himself unhurt, immediately turned back again, and stationed himself in his former place. The powder in both pieces was wet ; they, therefore,...
Page 150 - ... that he who ruleth his own spirit is greater than he who taketh a city...
Page 40 - My uncle's fearful look. And saw how all his quivering frame In strong convulsions shook. A silent terror o'er me stole, A strange, unusual dread ; His lips were white as bone — his eyes Sunk far down in his head ; He gazed on me, but 'twas the gaze Of the unconscious dead. Then suddenly he turned him round...
Page 261 - So saying, he placed himself close beside the stone which for the moment defended us, and looked undauntedly upon the lightning eyes of the tiger. Lincoln raved and swore ; and Frank took a piece of strong cord from his pocket, and hastened to the farther end of the cave — I knew not with what design. We soon, however, heard a low, stifled groaning; and the tiger, who had heard it also, became more restless and disturbed than ever.
Page 261 - Its frightful roaring, too, penetrated to the depths of the cavern, and was answered by the hoarse growling of the cubs, which Lincoln and Frank had now tossed from them. Our ferocious enemy attempted first to remove the stone with his powerful claws, and then to push it with his head from its place ; and these efforts, proving abortive, served only to increase his wrath.
Page 191 - Acropolis, which, centuries before, the hardy Median scaled, while leading on the conquering Persians, whose tents had covered the very spot on which I was reclining. Before me were the vestiges of what had been the palace of the gorgeous Croesus; within its walls were once congregated the wisest of mankind, Thaïes, Cleohulus, and Solon.
Page 260 - After the first sensation of horror and surprise, which rendered me motionless for a moment, had subsided, I grasped my firearms. Wharton had already regained his composure and self-possession; and he called to us to assist him instantly in blocking up the mouth of the cave with an immense stone, which fortunately lay near it. The sense of approaching danger augmented our strength, for we now distinctly heard the growl of the ferocious animal, and we were lost beyond redemption if it reached the...

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