Mexico in 1827, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn., 1829 - Mexico
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Page 46 - It had attained its full growth when that monarch was on the throne (1520), so that it must now be at least 400 years old; yet it still retains all the vigour of youthful vegetation. The trunk is forty-one feet in circumference, yet the height is so majestic as to make even this enormous mass appear slender.
Page 43 - ... of trees, shrubberies, &c. It has a carriage-road round it, to which it is the fashion for ladies to drive out about four in the afternoon, and their carriages being drawn up in a long line, often remain stationary for hours. " Amongst the many curious scenes that Mexico presented," says Mr. Ward, " I know none with which we were more struck than the Alameda. As compared with the Prado* of Madrid, it was, indeed, deprived of its brightest * To be described in a future portion of this work. ornament,...
Page 434 - ... on both sides to a very considerable distance. This I remarked more particularly when ascending the Red river ; a current from the Mississippi ran up it, not much less than one hundred miles. Nearly all the rivers of Texas, on the other hand, are "encaisses," and except near their mouths, seldom, if ever, produce inundations prejudicial either to property or health. Nevertheless, during the rainy season there is a sufficient rise in the rivers of Texas to render even the small branches navigable,...
Page 420 - ... southern extremity of the state, on an arid plain. The only carriage-road by which the plain of Chihuahua can be reached from the shores of the Gulf of Mexico, passes through this place. It contains about 12,000 inhabitants, and has several good streets communicating at right angles with the Plaza, in the centre of which is a large reservoir which supplies the town with water. Montelovez, with 3600 inhabitants, has some trade with the adjacent countries. Santa Rosa, with a population of 4000...
Page 6 - ... San Juan de Ula was still held by the Spaniards. Ward, with the Englishman's dry sense of humor, tells us how Victoria's men, wishing to send the members of the commission back to their ship with due honors, fired a volley from their guns. It seems, however, that the guns were not only loaded but "directed against the castle, which immediately opened its batteries in return, so that for some time we had the pleasure of finding ourselves between two fires..
Page 298 - Good Success Mine' (Bueno Successo) was discovered by an Indian, who swam across the river after a great flood. On arriving at the other side, he found the crest of an immense lode laid bare by the force of the water. The greater part of this was pure massive silver, sparkling in the rays of the sun. The whole town of Batopilos went to gaze at the extraordinary sight as soon as the river was fordable. This Indian extracted great wealth from his mine, but, on coming to the depth of three Spanish...
Page 298 - ... bars, with a point at one end and a chisel at the other, for cutting out the silver. The owner of the Pastiano used to bring the ores from the mine with flags flying, and the mules adorned with cloths of all colors. The same man received a reproof from the Bishop of Durango when he visited Batopilos for placing bars of silver from the door of his house to the great hall (sala) for the bishop to walk upon.
Page 289 - ... machinery was unknown in the north, and a malicati, primitive as the invention is, would have excited ^almost as much astonishment as a steam engine itself. The mines were worked as long as the water could be raised, without inconvenience, by two or three tenatoris (carriers) with leather buckets, and abandoned when the discharge of this duty became too laborious- Most of the principal districts may, consequently, be regarded as virgin ground, and there are few in which the old shafts might not...
Page 46 - On entering the gardens of Chapultepec (near Meiico), the first object that strikes the eye is the magnificent cypress (Subino Ahuahuete, or Cvpressus disticha), called the Cypress of Montezuma. It had attained its full growth when that monarch was on the throne (1520), so that it must now be at least 400 years old, yet it still retains all the vigour of youthful vegetation. The trunk is 41 feet in circumference, yet the height is so majestic as to make even this enormous mass appear slender.

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