Into the Unknown: Leadership Lessons from Lewis and Clark's Daring Westward Adventure (Google eBook)

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AMACOM Div American Mgmt Assn, Jan 1, 2004 - Electronic books - 245 pages
2 Reviews

If life is an adventure, no one will ever live it more fully than Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. Commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the rumored Northwest Passage, Lewis and Clark instead discovered a seemingly endless land whose very existence foretold a future America infinitely different from what had been imagined.

May 2004 marks the beginning of a two-and-a-half year bicentennial celebration of their incredible journey and its significance to the history of America. Against staggering odds, these unique men inspired such absolute loyalty in each other and in their group that they are still widely regarded as the most successful leadership team in American history.

Today's leadership adventures unfold in the rugged terrain of business, and who better than Lewis and Clark to lead us through its toughest challenges? Their story resonates with business leaders of our time because they had to:

* Think strategically * Make tough and timely decisions * Surround themselves with good people * Manage resources * Motivate the team * Deal with different cultures * Assimilate information from many sources * Balance long-term goals against short-term realities * Learn from their mistakes * Try new approaches

Most importantly, they had to persevere and change course in the face of adversity. Their lessons will inspire business leaders to take their teams to new adventures of great discovery.

  

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User Review  - PointedPundit - LibraryThing

Timeless Leadership Lessons Using the 2 year adventure into the American Northwest as a backdrop, Jack Uldrich offers leaders ten timeless lessons. Commissioned by President Thomas Jefferson to ... Read full review

Into the unknown leadership lessons from Lewis & Clark's daring westward adventure

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Uldrich, president of the Nano Veritas Group, an international nanotechnology consulting firm, shares lessons learned from the remarkable journey of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark as they ... Read full review

Contents

THE JOURNEY OF THE CORPS OF DISCOVERY
23
PASSIONATE PURPOSE
35
PRODUCTIVE PARTNERING
55
HONORING DIFFERENCES
95
EQUITABLE JUSTICE
111
ABSOLUTE RESPONSIBILITY
129
MEANINGFUL MENTORING
147
REALISTIC OPTIMISM
167
RATIONAL RISK
185
CULTIVATING A CORPS OF DISCOVERY
201
EPILOGUE
223
INDEX
238
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Jack Uldrich is an acclaimed global futurist, best-selling author, and compelling keynote speaker. His past works include, The Next Big Thing Is Really Small: How Nanotechnology Will Change the Future of Your Business; Jump the Curve: 50 Essential Strategies to Help Your Company Stay Ahead of Emerging Technologies; and Higher Unlearning: 39 Post-Requisite Lessons for Achieving a Successful Future. He is the founder and "Chief Unlearning Officer" of the School of Unlearning an international consultancy designed to help organizations' success tomorrow by unlearning today. He can be reached at jack@schoolofunlearning.com.

The Lewis and Clark expedition was one of the earliest crossings of the United States. Eager to expand the country, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Lewis, formerly his private secretary, to seek a Northwest passage to the Orient. Lewis and his partner, William Clark, were both seasoned soldiers, expert woodsmen, and boatmen. They both kept journals and so did 4 sergeants and 1 private in the party of 43 men. They started from St. Louis in 1804, heading up to the Missouri River, across the Rockies, and down to the Pacific coast at the mouth of the Columbia River. The Indian woman Sacajawea ("Bird Woman") gave them valuable help on the hazardous journey, which lasted 2 years, 4 months, and 10 days, and cost the U.S. government a total of $38,722.25. Lewis was the better educated of the two captains, and his account has more force, but Clark was a superb observer who wrote in an ingenious phonetic spelling of his own invention. The official edition of the Journals did not appear until 1814, when they were edited in two volumes by Nicholas Biddle and Paul Allen. This text, a paraphrase of the journals, was used in various editions until 1904, when Reuben G. Thwaites edited an eight-volume edition, published in 1904--05. Many recent editions have followed the original text, making the journals available in all of their original freshness. Early in 1960 it was announced in the New York Times that 67 notes written by Clark had been given by Frederick W. Beinecke of New York to the Yale University Library. "The documents, finger-smudged, blotted and blurred with cross-outs, list personal observations previously unknown to historians. . . . The documents, consisting of old letters, envelopes and scraps of paper, were the subject of an unusual legal fight. After the Clark notes were found in an attic in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1952, the United States moved to obtain them. The Government contended the documents were part of the official records of Clark while he served the United States. The Federal Court of Appeals in St. Louis dismissed the suit on Jan. 23, 1958. The court test was closely watched by libraries, museums and the American Philosophical Society. Had the Government been upheld, the custody of similar historical documents would have been jeopardized. . . ." Shortly after the end of the expedition, Lewis was appointed governor of the Territory of Upper Louisiana. When he at last took up his post, he was mysteriously killed---or took his own life---in the lonely wilderness.

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