Animation: A Handy Guide

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A&C Black, 2009 - Art - 144 pages
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This handy guide is just that. It is small enough to handle and carry around easily, and is a must-have resource for everyone interested in animation history, theory and practice. The whole book is structured round 20 key events in animation history from Cave Art to the development of 3D computer-generated images. Each of the 20 sections is linked to a practical "Stuff for Students" section which gives clever first-hand instructions for animating anything from plasticine to pixels. Furthermore each of these 20 sections is linked to animated examples from the work of the author herself. The book provides a clearly laid out visual guide to animation at all levels and is further - and most importantly - directly linked to moving examples on a supporting DVD. The DVD also provides a wealth of web links and addresses to steer the user to animated examples of the historical works discussed and more.

Although aimed squarely at first year animation students this package could prove equally valuable in the hands of secondary school pupils, MA students or people at home who have 'always wanted to have a go' at animation. From one of the animators who brought us Paddington Bear, this book-and-DVD combination provides an integrated and self-sufficient learn-2D-animation package.

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About the author (2009)

Shelia Graber has been working in the animation field for many years. She is an art and animation teacher and has been commissioned to make animations by a long list of institutions including the Tate Gallery (London), NFT and Tyneside Cinema. She creates animation for websites (e.g. International Website for the Deaf with Granada TV) and also works with the police creating animation resources for their Young Offenders Programme. Sheila has won awards for her animated short films at both the London Film Festival and Cannes. She is currently a Visiting Professor at the University of Sunderland, and she also runs an animation company with her colleague Jen Miller.

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