The Seven Minutes: A Novel

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Simon and Schuster, 1969 - Censorship - 607 pages
26 Reviews
Dramatizes the hidden motivations and acitvities of censors and anti-censors, the problems of permissiveness and restraint, and the moral delimmas facing all of us today.

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THIS IS A RARE TYPE OF NOVEL WHICH IS NOT FULLY FICTION-OR FULLY CLASSIC-BUT OUTSTANDING IN POINTING OUT CERTAIN POINTS WE SUPPRESS FEARING THE SOCIETY-BUT IF WE READ THE LAST 30% WE FIND THIS TRUE-MANY FACTS REFLECTED

Review: The Seven Minutes

User Review  - Joe - Goodreads

Lots of interesting discussion and debate on the historical censorship of novels. Ultimately, it's about the First Amendment, bravely focusing on sexual topics in publication. Though it is ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
84
Section 3
132
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (1969)

Irving Wallace was born March 19, 1916 in Chicago, Illinois. He began writing for various magazines at age 15 and worked as a screenwriter for a number of Hollywood studios---Columbia, Fox, Warner Brothers, Universal, and MGM from 1950 to 1959, then he turned solely to writing books. His first major bestseller was The Chapman Report in 1960, a fictional account of a sexual research team's investigations of a wealthy Los Angeles suburb. Among other fictional works by Wallace are The Prize and The Word. His meticulously researched fiction often has the flavor of spicy journalism. A great deal of research goes into his novels, which cover a wide variety of subjects, from the presentation of the Nobel Prize to political scenarios. With their recurring dramatic confrontations, his novels lend themselves well to screenplay adaptation, and most of them have been filmed, including The Chapman Report and The Prize. Wallace has also compiled several nonfiction works with his family, including The People's Almanac and The Book of Lists, both of which have spawned sequels. Irving Wallace died June 29, 1990 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 74 from pancreatic cancer.

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