The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected: with Notes and Illustrations; an Account of the Life and Writings of the Author, Grounded on Original and Authentick Documents; and a Collection of His Letters, the Greater Part of which Has Never Before Been Published, Volume 1, Issue 1 (Google eBook)

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T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies, 1800
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Page 392 - He sought the storms ; but for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands, to boast his wit Great wits are sure to madness near allied, And thin partitions do their bounds divide; Else, why should he, with wealth and honour blest, Refuse his age the needful hours of rest?
Page 145 - With public zeal to cancel private crimes: How safe is treason and how sacred ill, Where none can sin against the people's will ! Where crowds can wink, and no offence be known, Since in another's guilt they find their own.
Page 304 - And weltering in his blood; Deserted at his utmost need By those his former bounty fed; On the bare earth exposed he lies With not a friend to close his eyes.
Page xviii - They have not the formality of a settled style, in which the first half of the sentence betrays the other. The clauses are never balanced, nor the periods modelled; every word seems to drop by chance, though it falls into its proper place. Nothing is cold or languid ; the whole is airy, animated, and vigorous : what is little is gay; what is great is splendid.
Page 257 - Thais led the way To light him to his prey, And like another Helen, fired another Troy! Thus, long ago, Ere heaving bellows learn'd to blow, While organs yet were mute, Timotheus, to his breathing flute And sounding lyre Could swell the soul to rage, or kindle soft desire.
Page 62 - Neander, to be in company together; three of them persons whom their wit and quality have made known to all the town; and whom I have chose to hide under these borrowed names, that they may not suffer by so ill a relation as I am going to make of their discourse.
Page viii - Whoever wishes to attain an English style, familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious, must give his days and nights to the volumes of Addison...
Page 154 - One day as the king was walking in the Mall, and talking with Dryden, he said, ' If I was a poet, (and I think I am poor enough to be one,) I would write a poem on such a subject in the following manner,' and then gave him the plan for it.
Page 140 - He that goeth about to persuade a multitude that they are not so well governed as they ought to be, shall never want attentive and favourable hearers...
Page 48 - Had we still paid that homage to a name, Which only God and nature justly claim ; The western seas had been our utmost bound, Where poets still might dream the sun was drowned; And all the stars, that shine in southern skies, Had been admired by none but savage eyes.

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