The anti-Gallican: or, Standard of British loyalty, religion and liberty. Including a collection of the principal papers, tracts, speeches, poems, and songs that have been published on the threatened invasion; together with many original pieces on the same subject (Google eBook)

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Printed for Vernor and Hood, 1904 - History - 496 pages
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Page 49 - Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war! — And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,* Straining upon the start. The game's afoot ; Follow your spirit : and, upon this charge, Cry — God for Harry ! England ! and Saint George...
Page 177 - Nor e'en thy virtues, tyrant, shall avail • To save thy secret soul from nightly fears, From Cambria's curse, from Cambria's tears...
Page 107 - We are afraid to put men to live and trade each on his own private stock of reason ; because we suspect that this stock in each man is small, and that the individuals would do better to avail themselves of the general bank and capital of nations, and of ages.
Page 397 - ... to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 107 - We fear God; we look up with awe to kings ; with affection to Parliaments ; with duty to magistrates ; with reverence to priests; and with respect to nobility.
Page 108 - Prejudice is of ready application in the emergency; it previously engages the mind in a steady course of wisdom and virtue, and does not leave the man hesitating in the moment of decision, sceptical, puzzled, and unresolved. Prejudice renders a man's virtue his habit; and not a series of unconnected acts. Through just prejudice, his duty becomes a part of his nature.
Page 8 - They boast they come but to improve our state, enlarge our thoughts, and free us from the yoke of error! Yes: they will give enlightened freedom to our minds, who are themselves the slaves of passion, avarice, and pride ! They offer us their protection : yes, such protection as vultures give to lambs —covering and devouring them...
Page 187 - I demand of your lordship, the justice of believing me to be with the greatest respect, My Lord, Your lordship's most obedient, and most obliged humble servant, JON.
Page 397 - Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and goodwill of my subjects...
Page 178 - Dear lost companions of my tuneful art, Dear as the light that visits these sad eyes, Dear as the ruddy drops that warm my heart, Ye died amidst your dying country's cries — No more I weep ; They do not sleep ; On yonder cliffs, a grisly band, I see them sit ; They linger yet, Avengers of their native land : With me in dreadful harmony they join, And weave with bloody hands the tissue of thy line.

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