The Life and Times of Hon. Humphrey Marshall: Sometime an Officer in the Revolutionary War ... Senator in Congress from 1795 to 1801 ... (Google eBook)

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Sun Publishing Company, 1892 - Legislators - 142 pages
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Page 69 - ... thereto. Your committee observe that the said suit was tried eighteen months before Mr. Marshall was chosen a member of the Senate, and that previous to his election mutual accusations had taken place between him and the judges of the said court relating to the same suit. The representatives of Kentucky have not furnished any copy of Mr. Marshall's answer on oath, nor have they stated any part of the testimony, or produced any of the said records or documents, or the copy of any paper in the...
Page 90 - The pretext assumed by the hunter was the avenging of the death of his son, murdered by the Indians at the supposed instigation of the English. As I hold the commission of a Civil Judge, it was, of course, to be my duty to protect him against the pretended murderer, whom I caused to be arrested and held in custody. I availed myself of this circumstance to communicate to...
Page 84 - This Major confirms all of Wilkinson's assertions, and gives it out as certain, that, next year, after. the meeting of the first assemblies in which Kentucky will act as an independent State, she will separate entirely from the Federal Union ; he further declares that he has come to this conclusion from having heard it expressed in various conversations among the most distinguished citizens of that State : that the direction of the current of the rivers which run in front of their dwellings points...
Page 87 - Nevertheless, sir, when the question was finally taken, fear and folly prevailed against reason and judgment. It was thought safer and more convenient to adhere to the recommendation of Congress, and, in consequence, it was decided that the people be advised to elect a new convention, which should meet in the month of November, in conformity with the ordinance which you will find in the Gazette, No.
Page 69 - If there were no objections of this sort the Committee would still be of opinion that the memorial could not be sustained. They think that in a case of this kind no person can be held to answer for an infamous crime unless on a presentment or...
Page 89 - He added that, as soon as our plan of operation should be agreed upon, these articles would be sent from Detroit, through Lake Erie, to the river Miami, and thence to the Wabash, to be transported to any designated point on the Ohio, and that a fleet of light vessels would be ready at Jamaica to take possession of the Balize, at the same time that we should make an attack from above. He assured me that he was authorized by Lord Dorchester to confer honors and other rewards on the men of influence...
Page 83 - I do not anticipate any obstacle from Congress, because, under the present Federal compact, that body can neither dispose of men nor money, and the new government, should it establish itself, will have to encounter difficulties which will keep it weak for three or four years, before the expiration of which I have good grounds to hope that we shall have completed our negotiations, and shall have become too strong to be subjected by any force which may be sent against us.
Page 87 - ... and powers were at an end, and we found ourselves in the alternative, either of proceeding to declare our independence, or of waiting according to the recommendation of Congress. This was the state of affairs, when the Honorable Caleb Wallace, one of our Supreme Judges, the Attorney-General Innis, and Benjamin Sebastian proposed a prompt separation from the American Union, and advocated with intrepidity the necessity of the measure. The artifice of Congress was exposed, its proceedings reprobated,...
Page 89 - I manifested favorable dispositions towards the interests of his Britannic Majesty, I soon gained his confidence so much so that he informed me that Great Britain, desiring to assist the American settlers in the West, in their efforts to open the navigation of the Mississippi, would join them with ready zeal, to dispossess Spain of Louisiana. He remarked that the forces in Canada were not sufficient to send detachments of them to us, but that Lord Dorchester would supply us with all the implements...
Page 92 - As my attention to this affair takes up the greater portion of my time, and prevents me from following any other pursuit, I certainly hope to obtain from the Spanish government at least some indemnification, if not a generous reward for my services. On principle, I am as much attached to the interests of Louisiana as any one of the subjects of his Catholic Majesty. But you know that my circumstances do not permit me to engage in his service and to abandon every other occupation, without the prospect...

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