The Child's Conception of the World

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Psychology - 397 pages
2 Reviews
A milestone of child psychology, The Child's Conception of the World explores the ways in which the reasoning powers of young children differ from those of adults.
  

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Review: The Child's Conception of the World

User Review  - Sunny - Goodreads

IN this book kids are psychologically experimented on by being asked questions like does the sun have feelings? where do rivers and lakes come from? why is the moon white. some of the series of ... Read full review

Contents

III
37
IV
61
V
88
VI
106
VII
123
VIII
169
IX
171
X
194
XII
253
XIII
256
XIV
285
XV
333
XVI
350
XVII
389
XVIII
395
XIX
396

XI
207

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Page 34 - ... is the effort to exclude the intrusive self. Realism, on the contrary, consists in ignoring the existence of self and thence regarding one's own perspective as immediately objective and absolute. Realism is thus anthropocentric illusion, finality — in short, all those illusions which teem in the history of science. So long as thought has not become conscious of self, it is a prey to perpetual confusions between objective and subjective...
Page xxxiv - ... as it is internal activity, and it is impossible to decide once for all whether the progress of the experiment is due to that of reason or the inverse. From this point of view the morphologic-reflex organization, that is, the physiological and anatomic aspect of the organism, gradually appears to the mind as external to it, and the intellectual activity which extends it by internalizing it presents itself as the essential of our existence as living beings. In the last analysis, it is this process...
Page 9 - And above all, it is so hard to find the middle course between systematization due to preconceived ideas and incoherence due to the absence of any directing hypothesis! The good experimenter must, in fact, unite two often incompatible qualities; he must know how to observe, that is to say, to let the child talk freely, without ever checking or side-tracking his utterance, and at the same time he must constantly be alert for something definitive; at every moment he must have some working hypothesis,...

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About the author (2007)

Jean Piaget (1896-1980) published more than 50 books and 500 papers, most notable among them being Language and Thought of the Child, Judgment and Reasoning in the Child, and The Psychology of Intelligence.

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