A treatise on highway construction: designed as a text-book and work of reference for all who may be engaged in the location, construction, or maintenance of roads, streets, and pavements (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Wiley, 1892 - Pavements - 696 pages
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Contents

Production and value of granite in the United Slates in 1889 for street uses
29
Analyses of sandstones
32
Specific gravity weight and resistance to crushing of sandstone 88
33
Production and value of sandstone in the United States in 1889 for street uses
34
Specific gravity weight and resistance to crushing of limestones
35
Production and value of limestone used for street purposes in the United States in 1889
36
Specific gravity weight and resistance to crushing of traprocks
37
Analyses of European bituminous rocks
38
Assays of American bituminous rocks
40
Prices of asphaltum in 1889
43
Analyses of clay
47
Specific gravity weight and resistance to crushing of wood
50
Absorptive power of wood
51
Specific gravity weight and resistance to crushing of various sub stances
53
STONE PAVEMENTS
55
Wear and duration of granite pavements in London
68
Number of granite blocks to the sqimre yard
71
Cost of granite block in various cities in the United States in 1890
72
Extent and cost of Belgian block in the United States in 1890
73
Extent and cost of cobblestone in the United States in 1890
74
Duration and cost of wood pavements in London
89
Success of in EuropeFailure of in AmericaAdvantages ofObjections
90
Wear of wood pavements
92
Extent and cost of wood pavements in various localities
93
First cost and cost of maintaining wood pavements in London
94
CHAPTER V
108
Extent and cost of asphalt pavements in various cities
114
Cost of asphaltblock pavements in various cities
145
BRICK PAVEMENTS
148
Cost of brick pavements
152
Advantages and defects of brick pavementsDurability ofSize
156
BROKENSTONE PAVEMENTS
164

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Page xxx - They will here meet with rutts which I actually measured four feet deep, and floating with mud only from a wet summer...
Page 553 - Corporation, is directly or indirectly interested therein, or in the supplies or work to which it relates, or in any portion of the profits thereof.
Page 541 - ... any improper materials used in its construction, or by or on account of any act or omission of the said Contractor or his agents...
Page 541 - All loss or damage arising out of the nature of the work to be done under this agreement, or from any unforeseen obstructions or difficulties which may be encountered in the prosecution of the same, or from the action of the elements, or from incumbrances on the line of the work, shall be sustained by the said Contractor.
Page 311 - ... sources are not isolated, and the whole mass of the soil forming the side slopes appears saturated, the drainage may be effected by excavating trenches a few feet wide at intervals to the depth of some feet into the side slopes, and filling them with broken stone, or else a general drain of broken stone may be made throughout the whole extent of the side slope by excavating into it. When this is deemed necessary, it will be well to arrange the drain like an inclined retaining-wall, with buttresses...
Page 310 - ... which are made a few feet wide and have a ditch on the inner side to receive the surface-water from the portion of the side slope above them. These benches catch and retain the earth that may fall from the portion of the side slope above.
Page 558 - ... nor assert that there was any misunderstanding in regard to the nature or amount of the work to be done.
Page 565 - ... all loss or damage arising out of the nature of the work aforesaid, or from the action of the elements, or from any unforeseen obstructions or difficulties which may be encountered in the prosecution of the same...
Page 347 - The determination of the values of the different factors entering into the problem is almost wholly a matter of judgment. An estimate for any one of the above factors is liable to be in error from 100 to 200 per cent, or even more, and of course any result deduced from such data must be very uncertain. Fortunately, mathematical exactness is not required by the problem nor warranted by the data. The question is not one of 10 or 20 per cent of increase; for if a 2-foot pipe is...
Page 282 - ... line being adopted, the course of the road should be made to deviate from the direct line, and follow the winding course which such a condition is supposed to necessitate. In the second case, that of two places situated on opposite sides of the same valley, there is, in like manner, the choice of a perfectly straight line to connect them, which would probably require a...

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