Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Volume 34 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Royal Meteorological Society, 1908 - Meteorology
0 Reviews
Phenological report contained in v. 3-71, issued as a supplement to v. 73-74, missing from vols. 56-58, 60-62.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 135 - Here— here's his place, where meteors shoot, clouds form, Lightnings are loosened, Stars come and go! Let joy break with the storm, Peace let the dew send! Lofty designs must close in like effects: Loftily lying, Leave him — still loftier than the world suspects, Living and dying.
Page 217 - ... $2.00. This volume is intended for persons who have not had special training in the technicalities of climatology. Climate covers a wholly different field from that included in the meteorological text-books. It handles broad questions of climate in a way which has not been attempted in a single volume. The needs of the teacher and student have been kept constantly in mind. 20.— Heredity. By J. ARTHUR THOMSON, MA, Professor of Natural History in the University of Aberdeen ; Author of " The Science...
Page 292 - They must be accompanied by a sealed envelope, bearing on the outside the same Motto, and containing inside the name and address of the sender.
Page 291 - HOOKER, in reply, said that when the relationship between two phenomena was not linear, they had to look very carefully at the results, and also consider very carefully what should be correlated. Simple correlation was frequently inapplicable, and higher mathematics might be required to bring out the true connection. On the other hand, various devices could in many cases be employed, eg, he had himself correlated the oscillations of the marriage rate and trade by correlating, not differences from...
Page 85 - ... Toll is taken all along the banks of industrial streams for raising steam and carrying on the multitudinous processes of manufacture. There is sometimes anxiety as to whether the waterways can be kept sufficiently supplied to float the water-borne traffic or to fight the silting action of the tides, and there is growing alarm as to the possibility of fish traversing the depleted and polluted streams to reach their spawning beds. Of recent years the value of the water-power which may be generated...
Page 89 - ... house which was brought in and weighed, was found to be only sixtyfour Ibs., though it measured three feet long and six and a half feet in circumference. The centre is not quite hollow, but in all there is a deep conical cavity at each end, and in many there is a small opening through which one can see, and by placing the head in this cavity in the bright sun, the concentric structure of the cylinder is quite apparent. So far as I am yet informed, they do not occur in any of the adjoining parishes,...
Page 148 - Meteorological Society be communicated to the President and Council of the Institution of Civil Engineers, and also of the Royal Astronomical Society, for having granted the Society free permission to hold its meetings in the rooms of their respective Institutions.
Page 85 - Of recent years the value of the water-power which may be generated in the lonely and lofty places amongst the western heights of Great Britain, where the rainfall is large and unfailing, has been recognised ; and chemical works for the production in electric furnaces of what a few years ago were rare substances are becoming familiar features in Wales and the Highlands. In Ireland, too, the rainfall is an unrecognised source of wealth which as yet has not been drawn upon to any appreciable extent....
Page 86 - I I think, at least as good an argument can be drawn from this consideration of physical geography in favour of supplying the great towns of the east from the large precipitation of the west, as can be drawn in the opposite sense from the artificial divisions of political geography. It seems to me that care for the watersupply of the country, coming as it does from the air that knows no bounds across the land, is by no means a parochial, but in the fullest sense a national matter, and should be dealt...
Page 33 - ... altitudes. In such conditions the general tendency seems to be for the breezes to blow as far as possible along the contours of the ground. In the case of a valley the line of least resistance is found along the bottom of the valley ; in the case of a ridge this line is again along the contours ; but there sometimes appears a breeze along and below the farther edge of the ridge, in a direction indicative of the general direction of the superimposed current (see Figs. 5 and 9). Horizontal deflection...

Bibliographic information