Disability, Liberation, and Development

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Oxfam, Jan 1, 1993 - Social Science - 244 pages
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The situation of disabled people provides a microcosm of the whole development debate and process. Disabled people are oppressed and marginalised in every country of the world, both North and South. Their lives are constrained by social attitudes which stem from fear and prejudice. By probing these prejudices and studying cases where they have been overcome, we gain an insight into the processes of liberation and empowerment that lie at the heart of any development message.
  

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Page 100 - In the context of health experience an impairment is any loss or abnormality of psychological, physiological or anatomical structure or function. Disability. In the context of health experience a disability is any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.
Page 154 - In childhood, a female must be subject to her father, in youth, to her husband, when her lord is dead, to her sons ; a -woman must never be independent.
Page 100 - In the context of health experience, a handicap is a disadvantage for a given individual, resulting from an impairment or a disability, that limits or prevents the fulfilment of a role that is normal (depending on age, sex, and social and cultural factors) for that individual.
Page 77 - They're very dedicated. I have nothing but respect for them. But I must say this: I have never, ever, met someone who sees me as whole. . . . Can you understand this? Can you? No one sees me and helps me see myself as being complete, as is. No one really sees how that's true, at the deepest level. Everything else is Band-Aids, you know. Now I understand that this is what I've got to see for myself, my own wholeness. But when you're talking about what really hurts, and about what I'm really not getting...
Page 76 - I've been chronically ill for twelve years. Stroke. Paralysis. That's what I'm dealing with now. I've gone to rehab program after rehab program. I may be one of the most rehabilitated people on the face of the earth. I should be President. I've worked with a lot of people, and I've seen many types and attitudes. People try very hard to help me do my best on my own. They understand the importance of that self-sufficiency...
Page 34 - Duffy, 1981). Fine and Asch explain: To be male in our society is to be strong, assertive and independent; to be female is to be weak, passive and dependent, the latter conforming to the social stereotypes of the disabled. For both categories the disabled woman inherits ascriptions of passivity, and weakness. (1985...
Page 64 - ... death rate of people with a spinal injury within 2 years of the injury is as high today as it was in the developed world before the Second World War. While not being able to put an accurate figure onto it, there is no doubt that all over the world, there is a close link between disability and poverty. malnutrition, mothers weakened by frequent childbirth, inadequate immunisation programmes, accidents in overcrowded homes, all contribute to an incidence of disability among poor people that is...
Page 76 - I've worked with a lot of people, and I've seen many types and attitudes. People try very hard to help me do my best on my own. They understand the importance of that self-sufficiency, and so do I. They're positive and optimistic. I admire them for their perseverance. My body is broken, but they still work very hard with it. They're very dedicated. I have nothing but respect for them. But I must say this: I have never, ever, met someone who sees me as whole ... Can you understand this? Can you? No...
Page 34 - Why study women with disabilities? They reinforce traditional stereotypes of women being dependent, passive, and needy." Feminist anthologies, including key works that mindfully integrate racial and minority group concerns with gender analyses, continue to exclude women with disabilities (Cox 1981; Eisenstein and Jardine 1985; Freeman 1984; Sargent 1981; Snitow, Stansell, and Thompson 1983). In 1983, Hester Eisenstein...
Page 103 - I am a person. You are a person. Without you I am not a person, for only through you is language made possible and only through languige is thought made possible and through thought humaneness made possible.

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About the author (1993)

Peter Coleridge is currently Inependent consultant on development specialising in disability at Independent Consultant, Self-Employed, Llandrindod Wells, United Kingdom

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