Electrochemical methods: fundamentals and applications

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Wiley, Sep 2, 1980 - Science - 718 pages
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Takes the student from the most basic chemical and physical principles through fundamentals of thermodynamics, kinetics, and mass transfer, to a thorough treatment of all important experimental methods. Treats application of electrochemical methods to elucidation of reaction mechanisms; double layer structure and surface processes, and their effects on electrode processes are developed from first principles; other key features include a chapter on operational amplifier circuits and electrochemical instrumentation, unique coverage of spectrometric and photochemical experiments, and Laplace transform and digital simulation techniques. Contains numerous examples, illustrations, end-of-chapter problems, references, uniform mathematical notation, and an extensive list of symbols, abbreviations, definitions, and dimensions.

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I have not read it till now. But according to my guide it is the best book. Read full review

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$134 on Amazon and worth every cent. And I think I've just about read it cover to cover, excepting the chapters on dropping mercury electrodes. Read full review

Contents

Introduction and Overview of Electrode Processes I
1
Potentials and Thermodynamics of Cells
44
Kinetics of Electrode Reactions
86
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About the author (1980)

About the author ALLEN J. BARD is Norman Hackerman-Welch Regents Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has been a faculty member since 1958. Professor Bard is the recipient of more than twenty academic awards, most recently the Luigi Galvani Medal of the Societa Chimica Italiana, 1992; the G. M. Kosolapoff Award of the American Chemical Society, 1992; and the Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry of the Eastern Analytical Symposium, 1990. A frequent lecturer at major universities throughout the United States and Canada, and a member of numerous professional and academic organizations, Professor Bard is Editor in Chief of the Journal of the American Chemical Society and served as president of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry from 1991 to 1993. He received his PhD in electroanalytical chemistry from Harvard University in 1958.

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