In Great Waters: Four Stories (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper & Brothers, 1901 - Short stories - 222 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 202 - She said she was sixty years old, but was probably nearer seventy. She sat with her elbows on her knees and her face in her hands, and that peculiar vacant stare, perhaps looking out the window between us, not repelling us in the least, but perfectly indifferent to our presence.
Page 34 - Marken folk as a rule are dowered. These worthy women had much good advice to give, and gave it freely, as to how the little Krelis should be dealt with to strengthen him; but Marretje paid scant attention to their suggestions, being satisfied in her own mind that this wonderful baby of hers really was — as she had said he was on the day when his father first kissed him — a great strong boy. Krelis, seeing his little son only once a week, was the first to notice that he was not so strong as a...
Page 7 - ... a little forget his sorrow — his net came up heavy, and in it was his dead wife. Then it was that his madness fell upon him. By the time that he was come back to Marken — sailing his schuyt for a long night through the dark waters with this grewsomely ghastly lading — he was a crazed man. II. The shadow that rested on Jaap Visser's mind was a deep melancholy that for the most part kept him silent, yet that was broken now and then by outbursts of rage in which he raved against the cruel...
Page 85 - Well, perhaps we'd better not go into the matter today," he said. "You see, our line has traffic agreements with the NP and the Northwestern that must hold for the present, anyway. And then I've only just taken hold, you know, and I must look around a little before I do anything at all. But I might write to my father to come up here when he can, and then he and you could have a talk." The Major's look of eager cheerfulness faded at the beginning of this cooling rejoinder, but he brightened again...
Page 15 - ... come as usual to the tavern — and went to a white heat when a late arrival, a young fellow who lived in the Kerkehof. told that as lie came past Jaap Visser's house he had seen Krelis sitting on the bench in front of it talking away with old Jaap and making eyes behind old Jaap's back at Marretje. At first, being so entirely incredible, this statement was scouted scornfully: but it aroused so lively a discussion that presently the whole company left the tavern and went over in a body to the...
Page 107 - He was not superstitious, exactly; but h is sub-consciousness that the direction in which he was sliding — along the lines of least resistance — was at least questionable, made him rather open to feelings about bad and good luck. Being arrived at Eutaw Castle, he inferred from what the Major said and from what Ulrica looked that the domestic storm of the previous day had been a vigorous one — and was glad that he had kept out of it. But it had blown over pretty well, and his good-natured chaff...
Page 77 - Castle may be a fail nah; but within it, suh, yo' will find in this cold No'the'n region the genuine wahm hospitality of a true Southe'n home!" Maltham perceived that the only apology which he could offer for laughing at this absurd house — the absurdity of which became rather pathetic, he thought, in view of its genesis — was to accept its owner's invitation to enter it. Acting on this conclusion, he turned into the enclosure — the gate, hanging loosely on a single hinge, was standing open...
Page 8 - It did not unfit him for work. He had his living to make; and he made it, as all the men of Marken made their living, by fishing. But those who sailed with him in his schuyt said that always as the net came home he hauled upon it with tight-shut eyes; that always, as it was drawn inboard, he turned away — until the thrashing of the fish and some word about the catch from his companions assured him that he might look without fear of such a sight as that which had flashed burning through his eyes...
Page 94 - No," said Maltham with a laugh, " I never did. Did you?" Ulrica remained grave. "Yes," she answered, "and I almost did it, too. You see, it was this way: A man, one of the campers down on the Point, was rude to me. He was drunk, I think. But I did not think about his being drunk, and that I ought to make allowances for him. Somehow, I had not time to think. Everything got red suddenly — and before I knew what I was doing I had out my knife. The man gave a scream — not a cry, but a real scream...
Page 123 - Geo'ge," the Major went on presently. "I see by youah looks that I have youah sympathy. I am most grateful to yo' fo' it, most grateful indeed !" In a moment he added : " Hahk ! She's coming now! I heah heh step outside. Hahk how heavy and slow it is— and she always as light on heh feet as a bird ! To heah heh walk that way almost breaks my haht!" And then he checked himself suddenly, and tried to look rather unusually cheerful, as Ulrica entered the room. IX. Being braced to meet some sort of...

Bibliographic information