Cook's oracle: containing receipts for plain cookery, on the most economical plan for private families : containing also a complete system of cookery for Catholic families (Google eBook)

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Cadell, 1836 - Cooking - 422 pages
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Page 19 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectared sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 20 - At supper this night he talked of good eating with uncommon satisfaction. "Some people," said he, "have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully; for I look upon it that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else.
Page 22 - Johnson's own notions about eating however were nothing less than delicate : a leg of pork boiled till it dropped from the bone, a veal pie with plums and sugar, or the outside cut of a salt buttock of beef, were his favourite dainties : with regard to drink, his liking was for the strongest, as it was not the flavour, but the effect he sought for, and professed to desire ; and when I first knew him, he used to pour capillaire into his Port wine.
Page 322 - ... milk, which is drawn from the cow, that useful animal, that eats the grass of the field, and supplies us with that which made the greatest part of the food of mankind in the age which the poets have agreed to call golden. It is made with an egg, that miracle of nature, which the theoretical Bumet has compared to creation. An egg contains water within its beautiful smooth surface ; and an unformed mass, by the incubation of the parent, becomes a regular animal, furnished with bones and sinews,...
Page 71 - This, however, demands a patient and perpetual vigilance, of which few persons are, unhappily, capable. The cook must take especial care that the water really boils all the while she is cooking, or she will be deceived in the time ; and make up a sufficient fire (a frugal cook will manage with much less fire for boiling than she uses for roasting) at first, to last all the time, without much mending or stirring, and thereby save much trouble.
Page 166 - Soak them in cold water, wash them well, then put them into plenty of boiling water, with a handful of salt, and let them boil gently till they are tender, which will take an hour and a half, or two hours ; the surest way to know- when they are done enough, is to draw out a...
Page 22 - I never knew any man who relished good eating more than he did. When at table, he was totally absorbed in the business of the moment; his looks seemed rivetted to his plate; nor would he, unless when in very high company, say one word, or even pay the least attention to what was said by others, till he had satisfied his appetite...
Page 39 - Rasselas then entered with the princess and Pekuah, and inquired, whether they had contrived any new diversion for the next day ? Such, said Nekayah, [is the state of life, that none are happy but by the anticipation of change : the change itself is nothing ; when we have made it, the next wish is to change again. The world is not yet exhausted : let me see something to-morrow which I never saw before.
Page 271 - Wherefore did Nature pour her bounties forth With such a full and unwithdrawing hand, Covering the earth with odours, fruits, and flocks, Thronging the seas with spawn innumerable, But all to please and sate the curious taste?
Page 342 - Peel one dozen and a half of good Apples, take out the cores, cut them small, put into a stewpan that will just hold them, with a little water, a little cinnamon, two cloves, and the peel of a lemon, stew over a slow fire till quite soft, then sweeten with moist sugar, and pass it through a hair sieve, add to it the yolks of four eggs and one white, a quarter of a pound of good butter, half a nutmeg, the peel of a lemon grated, and the juice of one lemon ; beat...

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