African music: a people's art

Front Cover
L. Hill, 1975 - Music - 184 pages
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The nature of African music and its meanings are given plus a description of the instruments used.

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Review: African Music: A People's Art

User Review  - Sean - Goodreads

this is precisely what it sounds like, nothing more nothing less (well, maybe a bit of anti-colonialist rhetoric as icing on the social anthropology cake...) fun and full of interesting tidbits. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
12
Section 3
17

19 other sections not shown

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About the author (1975)

Francis Bebey, 1929 - 2001 Francis Bebey was born in Douala, Cameroon in 1929. He attended schools in the United States and France and decided to settle in France when he was through with his education. His most famous work is "African Music: A People's Art." Bebey was employed at Unesco where he eventually became the head of the agency's music department. Bebey retired in 1974 to spend more time on writing music and compositions. He wrote music for many instruments, from the guitar to the pygmy flute and recorded some of those compositions. He also liked to blend African music with various music styles from around the world and was considered an authority on African traditional music. In 1975, Bebey published "African Music: A People's Art," which surveyed Africa's musical heritage and included a discography and a collection of photographs of famous African musicians. He also wrote "The Ashanti Doll" in 1977, which is a novel set in Ghana. Francis Bebey died on May 28 in Paris at the age of 72.

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