Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter are Transforming Popular Culture (Google eBook)

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ABC-CLIO, Jun 30, 2011 - Computers - 190 pages
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Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter are Transforming Popular Culture explores the ongoing digital revolution and examines the way it is changing—and will change—the way people live and communicate. Starting from the proposition that the Internet is now the center of popular culture, the book offers descriptions of blogs and Twitter and the online behavior they foster. It looks at the demographics of users and the impact of the Internet on knowledge, thinking, writing, politics, and journalism.||A primary focus is on the way blogs and tweets are opening up communication to the people, free from gatekeepers and sanctioned rhetoric. The other side of the coin is the online hijacking of the news and its potential for spreading misinformation and fomenting polarization, topics that are analyzed even as the situation continues to evolve. Finally, the book gathers predictions from cultural critics about the future of digital popular culture and makes a few predictions of its own.
  

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Review: Bloggerati, Twitterati: How Blogs and Twitter Are Transforming Popular Culture

User Review  - Harish Puvvula - Goodreads

Unimpressive. Dry. No take aways. Lot of numbers about percentage of bloggers, twitter users, demographics, nationalities. most of the content is repetitive Read full review

Contents

Introduction Blogs Twitter and Popular Culture
1
Popular Culture in a Digital Age
17
Got Blog?
37
Twitter World
51
Are Blogs and Twitter Hijacking Journalism?
67
Language in a Twittering Blogging World
85
Issues in the Age of Oversharing
103
Inventing the Digital Self
119
Bloggerati Twitterati and the Transformation of Practically Everything
135
Welcome to the Revolution
147
Notes
151
Selected Bibliography
177
Index
181
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Mary Crossis emerita professor of English at Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison, NJ, where she was chairman of the English Department.

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