Watergate Victory: Mardian's Appeal

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University Press of America, Jan 1, 1995 - History - 265 pages
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The appeal of the conviction of Robert Mardian in the Watergate conspiracy trial before Judge John Sirica is the topic of this intriguing book. Written by a member of the defense team that prepared Mardian's appeal, Watergate Victory provides a unique defense perspective on the Watergate case while also discussing legal issues that were central to the Watergate case but which have largely been ignored. Issues that are analyzed include the admissibility of the White House tapes at the trial, the ethical obligation of the attorneys for the Committee to Re-elect the President to keep confidential what they had learned from Gordon Liddy, and issues involving multiple conspiracies, variance and severance. Contents: Two Paths to D.C.; A Man's Life is at Stake; The Only Charge Conspiracy; Beverly Hills to Burning Tree; A Slight PR Problem; Confession, Confidentiality and Commitments; Have a Fire; The CIA Connection; Hush Money; Read the Lead Sheets; Surrogates and Security; Conflict between CRP Counsel; Legal Issues in a Political Case; White House Tape Memos; Spokes, Chains and Mulitiple Conspiracies; Variance Sham or Good Faith; Spillover, Sickness and Severance; Uniquely Among the Defendants; Vague and Sprawling; Highly Prejudicial and Untrustworthy; Erroneous and Self Serving; Last But Most Important; Free Mardian; No Surprises; Retreat to Harmless Error; Fallacious Premises and Adequate Instructions; No Surprises II; Responding to the Government; More Memos and the Joint Appendix; The Reply Belief; Oral Argument; The Opinion; The Press and Richard Nixon; A Ruff Decision.

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Contents

Two Paths to D C
1
A Mans Life is at Stake
7
The Only Charge Conspiracy
11
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Arnold Rochvarg is Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law.

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