Bride of Frankenstein

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British Film Institute, 1997 - Performing Arts - 68 pages
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Generally considered a greater film that its predecessor, Frankenstein, this sequel starred Elsa Lanchester as the eponymous heroine and Boris Karloff repeating his role as the monster. Manguel gives a detailed and highly sensitive account of the film's felicities of inventive filmmaking. He also traces the literary roots of the Frankenstein myth, the creation of a living being by a man usurping the powers of a jealous God. And he finds echoes in the work of modern artists such as Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp of the Bride as a kind of femme fetale, monstrous and threatening. Generally considered a greater film that its predecessor, Frankenstein, this sequel starred Elsa Lanchester as the eponymous heroine and Boris Karloff repeating his role as the monster. Manguel gives a detailed and highly sensitive account of the film's felicities of inventive filmmaking. He also traces the literary roots of the Frankenstein myth, the creation of a living being by a man usurping the powers of a jealous God. And he finds echoes in the work of modern artists such as Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp of the Bride as a kind of femme fetale, monstrous and threatening.

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About the author (1997)

Alberto Manguel is the author of A History of Reading and (with Gianni Guadalupi) of The Dictionary of Imaginery Places. His novel News from a Foreign Country Came won the McKitterick prize in 1992.

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