The Middle Years (Google eBook)

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1917 - Authors - 119 pages
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Page 103 - Oh yes, you may do what you like — so long as you don't kiss me before the cabman!" The allusion was explained for us, if I remember — a matter of some more or less recent leavetaking of admirer and admired in London on his putting her down at her door after being taken to the play or wherever; between the rugged...
Page 11 - ... them. Not to be denied also, over and above this, is the downright pleasure of the illusion yet again created, the apparent transfer from the past to the present of the particular combination of things that did at its hour ever so directly operate and that isn't after all then drained of virtue, wholly wasted and lost, for sensation, for participation in the act of life, in the attesting sights, sounds, smells, the illusion, as I say, of the recording senses.
Page 83 - Ah those books — take them away, please, away, away!' I hear him unreservedly plead while he thrusts them again at me, and I scurry back into our conveyance, where, and where only, settled afresh with my companion, I venture to assure myself of the horrid truth that had squinted at me as I relieved our good friend of his superfluity. What indeed was this superfluity but the two volumes of my own precious 'last' — we were still in the blest age of volumes — presented by its author to the lady...
Page 6 - I ... was again and again in the aftertime to win back the homeliest notes of the impression, the damp and darksome light washed in from the steep, black, bricky street, the crackle of the strong draught of the British 'sea-coal' fire, much more confident of its function, I thought, than the fires I had left, the rustle of the thick, stiff, loudly unfolded and refolded 'Times,' the incomparable truth to type of the waiter, truth to history, to literature, to poetry, to Dickens, to Thackeray, positively...
Page 84 - What indeed was this superfluity but the two volumes of my own precious "last" — we were still in the blest age of volumes — presented by its author to the lady of Milford Cottage, and by her, misguided votary, dropped with the best conscience in the world into the Witley abyss, out of which it had jumped with violence, under the touch of accident, straight up again into my own exposed face? The bruise inflicted there I remember feeling for the moment only as sharp, such a mixture of delightful...
Page 89 - The fond prefigurements of youthful piety are predestined, more often than not, I think, experience interfering, to strange and violent shocks. . . . Fine, fine, fine, could he only be. . . ." So he begins, and so continuing for some time leads us up to the pronouncement that " Tennyson was not Tennysonian.
Page 5 - Hotel ('Radley's,' as I had to deplore its lately having ceased to be dubbed,) and handed me over without a scruple to my fate. This doom of inordinate exposure to appearances, aspects, images, every protrusive item almost, in the great beheld sum of things, I regard in other words as having settled upon me once -for all while I observed for instance that in England the plate of buttered muffin and its cover were sacredly set upon the slop-bowl after hot water had been ingenuously poured into the...
Page 83 - As James was about to leave, and indeed was at the step of the brougham with Mrs. Greville, GH Lewes called on him to wait a moment. He returned to the doorstep, and waited till Lewes hurried back across the hall, " shaking high the pair of blue-bound volumes his allusion to the uninvited, the verily importunate loan of which by Mrs. Greville had lingered on the air after his dash in quest of them " : — " Ah, those books — take them away, please, away, away...
Page 88 - ... there was a deliberation about it that precluded the idea of a spring; that, namely, of addressing something of the Laureate's very own to the Laureate's very face. Beyond the sense that he took these things with a gruff philosophy — and could always repay them, on the spot, in heavilyshovelled coin of the same mint, since it was a question of his genius— I gather in...
Page 105 - I heard him in cool surprise take even more out of his verse than he had put in." And so by a series of qualifications which are all beautifully adapted to sharpen the image without in the least destroying it...

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