Critique, Norm, and Utopia: A Study of the Foundations of Critical Theory

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Columbia University Press, 1986 - History - 455 pages
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Displaying an impressive command of complex materials, Seyla Benhabib reconstructs the history of theories from a systematic point of view and examines the origins and transformations of the concept of critique from the works of Hegel to Habermas. Through investigating the model of the philosophy of the subject, she pursues the question of how Hegelīs critiques might be useful for reforumulating the foundations of critical social theory.

  

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Review: Critique, Norm, and Utopia: A Study of the Foundations of Critical Theory

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

This is one the best interpretations of Critical Theory and Habermas' approach to critical theory going. I used this text as an interpretative approach to understanding several of Habermas' works. It is accessible, straighforward and one of the better books available on critical theory. Read full review

Contents

Chapter One The Origins of Immanent Critique
19
Chapter Two The Origins of Defetishizing Critique
44
Transsubjective Ideal of Freedom
84
Chapter Five The Critique of Instrumental Reason
147
Chapter Six Autonomy as Mimetic Reconciliation
186
The Critique of Instrumental Reason
213
Chapter Seven The Critique of Functionalist Reason
224
Chapter Eight Toward a Communicative Ethics
279
Reformulation
297
Notes
355
Bibliography
411
Index
435
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About the author (1986)

Laura Doan is Associate Professor of English at SUNY Geneseo. She is the editor of Old Maids to Radical Spinsters: Unmarried Women in the Twentieth-Century Novel.

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