North Carolina: a royal province 1729-1775 (Google eBook)

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University press, 1901 - History - 71 pages
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Page 64 - Council, present in Council ; nor shall You execute yourself, or by Deputy, any of the said Offices; and it is Our further Will and Pleasure, that all Commissions, to be granted by You, to any Person or Persons to be Judges or Justices of the Peace...
Page 31 - ... of the province."* Clearly the intention was to secure, as far as possible, the substantial men of the province, though undoubtedly many other elements had to be taken into consideration. The councillors, therefore, did not receive their powers from the people of the province, and hence were not so much inclined to enter into their feelings. They were largely under the control of the governor, and their relations with him were usually close and friendly, for they both represented the same institution,...
Page 19 - The exact date of his birth is not known, but it was probably before 1690.
Page 4 - ... colonial assembly the legislation desired by the crown, and furthermore, he was expected to keep the home government informed on a wide range of topics connected with the condition of the province and its administration. He was the head of the whole administrative machinery of the province, and in this capacity watched all the parts of the system, and, so far as possible, directed its movements. It was his duty, not only to recommend desired legislation, but also to prevent the passage of all...
Page 44 - This right of the governor was denied by many of the colonists, and for some time after his administration began, Governor Dobbs was not enabled to carry out his intentions. In 1759 the council ordered that the governor issue a proclamation to the effect that, upon the dissolution of the assembly elected at that time, no writs of election could be issued to the several counties unless they took out charters of incorporation from the governor. After 1759 the...
Page 30 - ... much interest, though at times with little intelligence, their mistakes being mostly those of judgment. At times they adhered obstinately to the letter of their instructions and in so doing rendered their position and that of the Crown weak. They often forgot that the people under the proprietors had governed themselves almost without restraint, and often ignored the fact that a people with such a history would not readily yield to prerogative government. The two royal governors who achieved...
Page 29 - ... governor, his duties, powers, and rights. To some students of this period of North Carolina history it may appear that the governors of that time were, for the most part, worthless and vacillating, but one must bear in mind before so judging them that they were a part of an inefficient system, for the machinery of English colonial government in the eighteenth century lacked much in unity and dispatch. The Board of Trade was slow in making its decisions on colonial matters, and the law officers...
Page 70 - ... towards discharging business without a majority of its entire number.:}: In taking such a position, the house was acting directly contrary to the Crown's instructions, which specifically stated that fifteen members should constitute a quorum. But as this was a point of considerable importance, it would not obey the crown, and would not act without a majority, or at least twenty-five of its number, whenever the whim struck it. It was much more difficult for the governor to control from twenty-five...
Page 9 - ... the chief justice whom the crown appointed, commissioners of oyer and terminer, and justices of the peace; also to pardon fines and forfeitures, when necessary, except in the case of treason and wilful murder, in which he could only grant a reprieve until the royal pleasure was known.1 In order to avoid long imprisonment, he was ordered to appoint two courts of oyer and terminer to be held yearly ; also to see that all prisoners in case of treason or felony had liberty to petition in open court...
Page 66 - It is stated that the government intend to issue a special commission of oyer and terminer and general jail delivery, for the trial of the residue of what are termed the " Fenian prisoners,

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