The Practice of Moral Judgment

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Harvard University Press, 1993 - Philosophy - 252 pages
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Barbara Herman argues for a radical shift in the way we perceive Kant's ethics. She convincingly reinterprets the key texts, at once allowing Kant to mean what he says while showing that what Kant says makes good moral sense. She urges us to abandon the tradition that describes Kantian ethics as a deontology, a moral system of rules of duty. She finds the central idea of Kantian ethics not in duty but in practical rationality as a norm of unconditioned goodness. This book both clarifies Kant's own theory and adds programmatic vitality to modern moral philosophy.

  

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Contents

On the Value of Acting from the Motive of Duty
1
Integrity and Impartiality
23
Mutual Aid and Respect for Persons
45
The Practice of Moral Judgment
73
What Happens to the Consequences?
94
Murder and Mayhem
113
Moral Deliberation and the Derivation of Duties
132
Obligation and Performance
159
Agency Attachment and Difference
184
Leaving Deontology Behind
208
Credits
243
Index
245
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Barbara Herman is Griffin Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Los Angeles.

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