The Book of Days, a Miscellany of Popular Antiquities

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General Books, Jul 4, 2012 - 760 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ...at Hampton Court, in the presence of the King and Queen and all the chief nobility of England. The bridal banquet was most splendid, and a masque was performed in the eveniug; but Lady Hatton was still in confinement. Shortly afterwards she was liberated, and gave a magnificent entertainment at Hatton House, which was honoured by the presence of the King and Queen, but Sir Edward Coke and all his servants were peremptorily excluded. Two years afterwards Sir John Villiers was raised to the peerage, as Viscount Purbeck and Baron Villiers of Stoke Pogis. But the sequel of these family broils was melancholy. Lady Purbeck deserted her husband, and lived with Sir llobert Howard, which rapidly brought on her degradation, imprisonment, and an early death. Lady Hatton pursued her husband with rancorous hatred, and openly avowed her impatience for his death. A report of his death having one day reached her, she immediately left London for Stoke to take possession of his mansion, but on reaching Cobibrook, she met one of OLD MANOB-HOCSE AT STOKE TOGIS. THE ANNUNCIATION. bis physicians, who informed her of his amendment. On hearing this she returned to London in evident disappointment. Sir Edward, m his solitary old age, must have viewed the fruits of his own scheme with bitter compunction. When eighty years of age, we are told, he 'felt himself alone on the earth, was suspected by his king, deserted by his friends, ana detested by his wife.' His only domestic solace, during the last two years of his life, was the company of his daughter, Lady Purbeck, who, much to her credit, left her paramour to watch over the last hours of her agect father. Three days before his death, being suspected of possessing seditious writings, his peace was disturbed by Sir...

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About the author (2012)

Robert Chambers is Research Associate, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex and the author of "Participatory Workshops" (2002) and "Ideas for Development" (2005).

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