The Laird's Lykewake and Other Poems (Google eBook)

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1877 - English poetry - 208 pages
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Page 149 - WE passed a woman tied by the neck to a tree, and dead. The people of the country explained that she had been unable to keep up with the other slaves in a gang, and her master had determined that she should not become the property of any one else if she recovered after resting for a time.
Page 56 - The Poetic Genius of my Country found me, as the prophetic bard Elijah did Elisha at the PLOUGH, and threw her inspiring mantle over me.
Page 149 - ... that she had been unable to keep up with the other slaves in a gang, and her master had determined that she should not become the property of any one else if she recovered after resting for a time. I may mention here that we saw others tied up in a similar manner, and one lying in the path shot or stabbed,* for she was in a pool of blood. The explanation we got invariably was that the Arab who owned these victims was enraged at losing his money by the slaves becoming unable to march, and vented...
Page 149 - A CHRISTIAN! going, gone!" Who bids for God's own image? for his grace, Which that poor victim of the market-place Hath in her suffering won? My God ! can such things be? Hast thou not said that whatsoe'er is done Unto thy weakest and thy humblest one Is even done to thee? In that sad victim, then, Child of thy pitying love, I see thee stand, Once more the jest-word of a mocking band, Bound, sold, and scourged again! A Christian up for sale! Wet with her blood your...
Page 93 - I have determined, the Almighty God being my help and shield, yet to suffer, if frail life might continue so long, even till the moss shall grow on mine eyebrows, rather than thus to violate my faith and principles.
Page 187 - A wish that to my latest hour Shall strongly heave my breast, That I for poor auld Scotland's sake Some usefu' plan or book could make, Or sing a sang at least.
Page 117 - That calls, when brimmed her festal cup, A nation's glory and her shame, In silent sadness up.
Page 23 - The lassie she was put to bed, an' aye her raivell'd words Were babblin' o' the streams an' flow'rs, an' chirp o' bonnie birds ; An' frae her sunny lips we learn'd o' some sweet lady's care, Wha laid her on the lap o' dreams, an' kaim'd her yellow hair. Quo...
Page 149 - Lualaba roll between them and their free homes ; they then lost heart. Twentyone were unchained as being now safe ; however, all ran away at once ; but eight, with many others still in chains, died in three days after crossing. They ascribed their only pain to the heart, and placed the hand correctly on the spot, though many think that the organ stands high up under the breast-bone. Some slavers expressed surprise to me that they should die, seeing they had plenty to eat and no work.
Page 167 - No trinmphs born of bond we claim ; but ours the nobler fray Of manly toil the men who wear the breeks o' hodden grey. Ho ! strain your eyes, and far behold, as in wild dreams of wine, The steel-ribb'd engine flash and leap and roar along the line, God ! What impassion'd power is this, that, blotched with...

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