Pierpont's Introduction: Introduction to The National Reader; a Selection of Easy Lessons, Designed to Fill the Same Place in the Common Schools of the United States that is Held by Murray's Introduction, and the Compilations of Guy, Mylius, and Pinnock, in Those of Great Britain (Google eBook)

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Carter, Hendee & Company, 1832 - Readers - 159 pages
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Page 139 - Away went hat and wig; He little dreamt, when he set out, Of running such a rig. The wind did blow, the cloak did fly, Like streamer long and gay, Till loop and button failing both, At last it flew away. Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung ; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, Up flew the windows all ; And every soul cried out, "Well done !
Page 138 - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A trainband captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding-day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
Page 35 - Now therefore, I pray thee, let thy servant abide instead of the lad a bondman to my lord; and let the lad go up with his brethren. For how shall I go up to my father, and the lad be not with me ? lest peradventure I see the evil that shall come on my father.
Page 140 - The bottles twain behind his back were shattered at a blow. Down ran the wine into the road, most piteous to be seen, Which made his horse's flanks to smoke, as they had basted been. But still he seemed to carry weight, with leathern girdle braced ; For all might see the bottle-necks still dangling at his waist.
Page 125 - To clear this doubt, to know the world by sight, To find if books, or swains, report it right, (For yet by swains alone the world he knew, Whose feet came wandering o'er the nightly dew...
Page 35 - And we said, We cannot go down : if our youngest brother be with us, then will we go down: for we may not see the man's face, except our youngest brother be with us.
Page 142 - Now let us sing, Long live the king, And Gilpin, long live he, And when he next doth ride abroad, May I be there to see!
Page 35 - And we said unto my lord, We have a father, an old man, and a child of his old age, a little one ; and his brother is dead, and he alone is left of his mother, and his father loveth him.
Page 125 - The pair arrive : the liveried servants wait; Their lord receives them at the pompous gate. The table groans with costly piles of food, And all is more than hospitably good. Then led to rest, the day's long toil they drown, Deep sunk in sleep, and silk, and heaps of down. At length 'tis morn, and at the dawn of day, Along the...
Page 91 - Play on, play on ; I am with you there, In the midst of your merry ring: I can feel the thrill of the daring jump, And the rush of the breathless swing. I hide with you in the fragrant hay, And I whoop the smothered call, And my feet slip up on the seedy floor, And I care not for the fall.

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