The Dedalus book of German decadence: voices of the abyss

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Dedalus, 1994 - Fiction - 289 pages
4 Reviews
The Brockhaus encyclopedia of 1896 referred to the decadent literary movement as "a symptom of today's nervous, senile, fragmented society which is impervious to anything healthy and natural" -- and which is primarily French. But beneath the brash and pompous exterior of the German Empire, decadent literature thrived, fueled by the music of Wagner, the paradoxes of Nietzsche, and the writings of Thomas Mann, the movement's self-styled chronicler and analyst. This analogy collects works by Sacher-Masoch, Trakl, Leppin, Przybyszewski, Mann, and other, demonstrating that Berlin, Vienna and Prague served equally with Paris as hosts for this provocative European cultural movement.

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Review: The Dedalus Book of German Decadence: Voices of the Abyss

User Review  - Marilyn Moreau - Goodreads

Heady stuff. You have to let yourself fall into it to get through it, or you'll be too distracted wondering how Harold's Purple Crayon managed to write so much damn prose. Read full review

Review: The Dedalus Book of German Decadence: Voices of the Abyss

User Review  - Peter Houlihan - Goodreads

This for me sums up the feeling of isolation and alienation of the mind in a ever changing society based on image rather than character how the mind is effected by ever changing imagery enjoyable in ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
From AustroHungary
26
Herman Bahr The School of Love
60
Copyright

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