Becoming an Effective Classroom Manager

Front Cover
SUNY Press, 1988 - Education - 215 pages
2 Reviews
Over the years, classroom management remains one of the greatest educational concerns of teachers, administrators, and parents. This practical resource for developing and upgrading personal classroom management skills and systems addresses that concern and will prove to be an invaluable guide for preservice and practicing educators.

Utilizing a balanced approach based on both scholarship and experience, Becoming an Effective Classroom Manager provides a discussion of models of management, a summary of effectiveness research and related management techniques, as well as coverage of routine and more complex managerial concerns and procedures. Steere's approach is multi-faceted, interweaving three areas of concern: prevention of disciplinary problems, dealing/coping with disciplinary problems, and development of techniques for insuring that problems do not recur. The book is filled with suggestions and techniques that have been successfully utilized in public school classrooms.

The author argues that institutions of higher learning must produce teachers who are equally adept and confident in their teaching methods, management skills, and their subject matter. His work will help teachers become not only better managers, but more effective teachers as well.
  

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Contents

A Portrayal of School Discipline
3
Classroom Management Approaches
11
Analyzing the models
13
Creating your own classroom management system
14
Management Models
17
Ginotts congruent communication
19
Maslows hierarchy of needs
21
Values and morality
23
Consequences
119
Hierarchical consequences
121
Punishment
122
Transitions
123
Desist techniques
124
Seatwork assistance
127
Special Managerial Concerns Methods and Resources
133
Crying
134

Transactional analysis
26
Dreikurss mistaken goal model
29
Glassers reality therapy
32
Contingency management
36
Canters assertive behavior
46
Joness management training
50
The Relationship of Research to Classroom Management
63
Research Relating to the Improvement of Instruction and Classroom Management
65
Research summaries
69
Consequences
70
Instructional methods
71
Monitoring
72
Seatwork
73
Managerial concerns
74
Accountability
75
Rules
76
Testing and grading
77
Time on task
78
The Use of Research to Improve Instruction Time on Task
81
Terms
84
Unengaged categories
85
Procedures
88
Approaches to Increasing Time on Task
91
The Use of Research to Improve Instruction Getting Ready to Manage Students
99
Preinstructional organization
101
Establishing Rules and Procedures
103
Student Accountability
105
Additional Managerial Concerns Methods and Resources
111
Routine Managerial Concerns and Methods
113
Force
115
Firmness versus roughness sarcasm and criticism
116
Lowprofile control
117
Rules
118
Rudeness toward the teacher
135
Tattling
136
Excuses
137
Corporal punishment
139
Stealing and cheating
140
Isolation
145
Cultural differences
147
Human resources
149
Appendices
155
Time Expenditures Lunch Count and Dismissal
156
Funny money Management System
159
How Am I Ever Going to Control this Class?
163
Classroom Auctions A Bonus for Students and Teacher
165
Signs of Drug Use
167
Sample Contract
169
Award Certificate
170
Signal card
171
List of reinforcers
173
Behavior Blossom source unknown
176
Conduct Countdown source unknown
178
Learnball
180
Other Managerial Techniques Discouraging slowness of work
182
Discouraging outofseat behavior
183
Beads as positive reinforcers
184
Handling visitors
185
Bulletin board for reinforcing behavior
186
Signal systems
187
Clothespins to check roll
188
Daily report cards
189
Different rules for different activities
190
References
192
Index
209
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Bob Steere is Professor of Education at Missouri Southern State College.

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