An Account of the Mutinies in Oudh and of the Siege of the Lucknow Residency: With Some Observations on the Condition of the Province of Oudh and on the Causes of the Mutiny of the Bengal Army (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley, 1858 - India - 484 pages
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Page 290 - If you hope to save this force, no time must be lost in pushing forward. We are daily being attacked D by the enemy, who are within a few yards of our defences.
Page 345 - The Major-General, therefore, in gratitude for and admiration of the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion; and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oude, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer.
Page 140 - ... they shot him ; and then rushing up, they killed the wounded and children, butchering them in a most cruel way. With the exception of the drummer boy, every one was killed of the above list, and besides, poor good Thomason and one or two clerks. They denuded the bodies of their clothes, for the sake of plunder.
Page 333 - Once fairly seen, all our doubts and fears regarding them were ended : and then the garrison's longpent-up feelings of anxiety and suspense burst forth in a succession of deafening cheers. From every pit, trench, and battery from behind the sand-bags piled on shattered houses from every post still held by a few gallant spirits, rose cheer on cheer...
Page 292 - I can only say do not negotiate, but rather perish sword in hand. Sir Colin Campbell, who came out at a day's notice to command, upon the news arriving of General Anson's death, promises me fresh troops, and you will be my first care. The reinforcements may reach me in from twenty to twenty-five days, and I will prepare everything for a march on Lucknow.
Page 330 - Havelock on the 10th of the month. He returned on the night of the 22nd, and was the bearer of good news. He brought a letter from General Sir James Outram, which announced to us that an army thoroughly appointed had crossed the Ganges on the 19th, and would, DV, soon relieve us. The General advised that we should not venture out of our defences ; and only attempt anything in aid of the relief force if we could safely do so.
Page 512 - The persevering constancy of this small garrison, under the watchful command of the Brigadier, has, under Providence, been the means of adding to the prestige of the British Army and of preserving the honour and lives of our country-women.
Page 362 - We now retreated into the original room. The enemy now mounted on the roof, scraped through the plaster, and threw quantities of lighted straw down into the room. Soon the smoke became intolerable, and the building itself got on fire.
Page 208 - ... Lawrence in person, accompanied by Colonel Inglis. This force assembled from the Muchee Bhowun and the Residency at the Iron Bridge about sunrise, and marched to the bridge over the Kookrail stream, which is about halfway to Chinhut. So far the road was metalled. But beyond this it was a newly -raised embankment, constructed of loose and sandy soil, in which every now and then gaps occurred, indicating the positions of future bridges. After some halt, during which no refreshment was served out...
Page 32 - His younger brother was more pleasing in appearance and demeanour. The Nana was introduced by me to Sir Henry Lawrence, who received him kindly, and ordered the authorities of the city to show him every attention. I subsequently met him parading through Lucknow with a retinue more than usually large. He had promised before leaving Lucknow to make his final call on the Wednesday. On the Monday, we received a message from him that urgent business required his attendance at Cawnpore, and he left Lucknow...

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