Alcoholism treatment: context, process, and outcome

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Oxford University Press, 1990 - Medical - 291 pages
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Based on the authors' extensive research, this book focuses on the context, processes, and outcomes of alcoholism treatment programs. It also investigates the influence of factors such as marital status, gender, family and work environments, stressful life events, and personal coping responses on patients' functioning up to 10 years after treatment. Bridging the gap between alcoholism treatment research and the field of program evaluation, this innovative study argues for a broader approach to treatment evaluation than the commonly used black-box model. In addition, it examines the impact of alcohol abuse on spouses and children of alcoholic patients. It will prove invaluable for those working in professional and lay groups interested in alcohol and substance abuse, as well as researchers, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers.

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Contents

Evaluating and Improving Alcoholism Treatment Programs
3
Objectives Methods and Assessment
17
ShortTerm Outcome and Patient Prognosis
36
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